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Search results for: tradition in all categories

1813 results found.

182 pages of results.
231. The Saturn Theory [Journals] [SIS Review]
... it a previous sun' is described as follows: Like a man was the sun when it showed itself ? It showed itself when it was born and remained fixed in the sky like a mirror. Certainly it was not the same sun which we see, it is said in their old tales' [7 ]. Equally widespread are traditions which report that a great monster once eclipsed the sun and brought the world to the brink of destruction. Countless cultures preserve memory of the terrifying time when Venus assumed a comet-like form [8 ], or when a spectacular conjunction of planets dominated the celestial landscape [9 ]. Such traditions can be documented from one culture to another ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 53  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/review/v2000n1/087sat.htm
... Earth of Prehistoric Man The Misread Record or The Deluge and its Cause Mythic Mountains The Ring of Truth A Glance at Compartive Mythology Isaac N. Vail "Far away in the twilight time of every people in every clime Dragons and griffins and monsters dire Born of water and air and fire Crawl and wriggle and foam with rage Through dusk, tradition and ballad age" We are so accustomed to think of mythology in its connection with the poetry of the Greeks and Romans that we forget, if indeed we have realized with our poet, that every people in every clime has a myth system of its own. To make our glance at comparative mythology comprehensive, we must keep this ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 53  -  19 Jun 2005  -  URL: /online/pubs/books/vail/glance.htm
233. Thoth Vol I, No. 17: June 30, 1997 [Journals] [Thoth]
... tales of disaster and upheaval in which the agent of destruction possesses cometary attributes, even as it is identified with the _planet_ Venus. The anomalous "cometary" traits of Venus in world mythology thus became key pieces of the argument, and the strength of the argument derived from the breadth of sources. Velikovsky did not rely on traditions of one region only, but drew on key evidences from every ancient civilization. He noted, for example, that in Mexican record, Venus was "the smoking star" the very phrase natives employed for a "comet." He noted in both the Americas and the Near East, a recurring association of Venus with celestial " ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 53  -  19 Mar 2004  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/thoth/thoth1-17.htm
234. The Nature of the Historical Record [Journals] [SIS Review]
... can trace her lineage back to Egbert, who became king of Wessex in 802 AD. Notwithstanding the "dark age" in Europe after the fall of the Roman Empire in the West and the barbarian and Mohammedan invasions, medieval Christian civilisation was firmly rooted in the amalgam of Greek, Roman and Hebrew cultural, religious, legal and political traditions which survived, more or less intact, from the "universal" Roman Empire. The literary part of this heritage comprised the Old and New Testaments and enough of the works of the most important Greek and Latin authors to provide at least an outline, and sometimes even more, of the history of the ancient world from the Greek ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 53  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/review/v0601to3/12natur.htm
235. The Cosmology Of Tawantinsuyu [Journals] [Kronos]
... From: Kronos Vol. IX No. 2 (Winter 1984) Home | Issue Contents The Cosmology Of Tawantinsuyu Jan N. Sammer See also Note (1 ). The traditional view of Inca religion was built chiefly on the writings of Garcilaso de la Vega, Bartolome de las Casas, and Pedro Cieza de Leon. In the Commentarios Reales of the hispanicized Inca nobleman, Garcilaso de la Vega, the cult of the Sun is portrayed as supreme. The chief temple in Cuzco, the Coricancha, is said to have been dedicated to the Sun (II.9 ) with similar Sun-temples scattered throughout the provinces; the Inca rulers allegedly prided themselves on being descended from ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 53  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0902/021cosmo.htm
... giants, trolls and oreads, gnomes and goblins, fairies who witched people, and ogres who ate them.65 The lowland dwellers who survived the cataclysm took refuge among the inhabitants of the highlands. Sometimes even considerable numbers, whole tribes, may have reached the safe heights. The Atlantis myth contains only indirect references, but in Greek traditional lore we find some significant passages. There is, for instance, that splendid myth mentioned, and thus preserved, by Apollonius Rhodius, the chief custodian of the great Alexandrian Library in the third century BC, in his Argonautica, where he tells of a time when there were `not as yet all the stars that wheel in ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 53  -  26 Mar 2007  -  URL: /online/pubs/books/bellamy/atlantis/descent.htm
237. Giants [Journals] [SIS Internet Digest]
... "previously", which implies that something which is no longer present or in existence, was previously present or in existence. . . . this implies that they no longer exist, although they did exist previously. Ev Cochrone: The belief that "there were giants in those days" is very widespread in nature. Consider the following tradition of the Pawnee Indians: "The first men who lived on earth were very large Indians. They were giants; very big and very strong." (George Grinnell, Pawnee Hero Stories and Folk-Tales," 1961, p. 354). According to Pawnee tradition, this race of giants was killed by the Flood. How ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 53  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/i-digest/1999-1/14giants.htm
... . The next Achaemenid king, Artaxerxes III, did however display some of the qualities of the early rulers and he reconquered many of the lost territories, including Egypt. He was also very much a Babylonian: I shall argue that he named himself Nebuchadrezzar to emphasise the point, a fact which helps explain the many (otherwise puzzling) traditions recalling a conquest of Egypt by a king Nebuchadrezzar. This was the Nebuchadrezzar who destroyed the tiny state of Judah and who enslaved the last of the Twelve Tribes of Israel. His wars against Judah reflect the campaigns of Artaxerxes III against Egypt and her allies; the pharaoh Necho, whose assistance king Zedekiah vainly sought, was actually Nectanebo ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 52  -  26 Mar 2007  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/review/v2002n2/15artax.htm
... , perhaps, to Sumatra, Java (which has lost the volcano of Krakatoa), the Moluccas, Kamchatka, and the Pacific generally. On the other hand, we do not uncommonly hear of terrific eruptions occasionally breaking out from mountains not previously suspected of being of a volcanic nature or of which accounts of former catastrophes existed but as tradition. Scrope, for instance, mentions Soufri'ere, St. Vincent, which erupted in 1812 after having been quiescent it was said from 1719. Popocatepetl, also, the great volcano in Mexico, has just burst into eruption in February, 1925 (as these pages are being passed for press), after a sleep Of 400 years ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 52  -  19 Jun 2005  -  URL: /online/pubs/books/beaumont/earth.htm
... threat of creationism in this country [the US], and we should show a united front." (Richard Leakey, ref. 63, p. 119) There have, at bottom, only ever been two models for the history of the Earth. The older is the historical or theistic model, purporting to rest on a tradition which goes back to the beginning of man and the Earth and attributing that beginning to the will of some god or gods. The other is the philosophical or atheistic model, purporting to be a rational explanation of the world and attributing all things to the workings of Nature. In the first model the beginning is an historical event and ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 52  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/review/v1993cam/007human.htm
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