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Search results for: shakespeare in all categories

123 results found.

13 pages of results.
... on her barge with their fans only make her "delicate cheeks" glow with their sensual warmth.31 She is portrayed as a disturber of natural order. She stands for excess, since she will not pause at the limits set by nature.32 Her object is to disrupt a pre-existing scheme. Thus she usurps the phallic role, Shakespeare suggests; of course, such usurpation is an attempt to achieve a reversal of the natural order, which was, after all, the object of the serpent in Eden.33 Because she is associated with serpents, notes Davidson, Cleopatra's Egypt is hideously fertile, full of snakes, and poisonous. She lives in a world which ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 56  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0104/037catas.htm
... the attraction of a great work of art? Approaching the field of literature from the context of past catastrophes, Dr Wolfe proposes startling depths to the world's great narratives. I: Velikovsky and Narrative Art The history of man as drawn by Velikovsky may be interesting and even inspiring; but what relation is there between it and literature, and Shakespeare in particular? The answer, I feel, lies in the intimate connection between what we are and what we do, which is anteriorly connected to what has happened to us. Such a point of view is unexceptional when applied to the individual, but I am referring to a different dimension, one that is communal, age-old and ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 45  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/review/v0204/104world.htm
... and so threatening, are now safely distant, in fixed orbits, presenting no living danger to the Earth, and so they too can be safely venerated. If one has read Velikovsky, the general action in Antony and Cleopatra is clearly catastrophic, and it is on this basis that I wish to analyze the corresponding celestial catastrophic imagery which Shakespeare has used to characterize the lovers at every important stage of their story's development. Once they are in love, Antony's proximity or distance directly affects Cleopatra's brilliance, 1.1 .9-10. Their attraction takes them beyond all established bounds, to find out new heaven, new earth, 1.1 .17. When Antony renounces ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 39  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0103/031catas.htm
... nature of Shakespeare's time may obscure and perhaps vitiate Professor Wolfe's argument. Why, one might be tempted to say, look for Velikovskian explanations for Shakespearean obsession with catastrophe when the facts Jaarsma has uncovered provide a perfectly reasonable raison d'Ítre for it? Such a view, however, is too facile an explanation for the catastrophism in the plays of Shakespeare and, indeed, in the writings of his contemporaries, be they playwrights, essayists, theologians, almanac writers, or poets. Though I nowhere mention the name of Dr. Velikovsky in my essays, it may be of interest to readers of KRONOS to know that I first came to my own thesis about Shakespeare's imagery through a ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 38  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0603/093note.htm
15. Contributors [Journals] [Kronos]
... an Associate Editor of the journal Pensee to which he contributed several articles. He has also published in Science, Biblical Archaeology Review, Astronomy, and SIS Review. Richard J. Jaarsma (Ph.D ., Rutgers Univ.); Professor of English at the William Paterson College of New Jersey. His previous publications include essays on Shakespeare, Oliver Goldsmith, and T. S. Eliot in such journals as Literature and Psychology, Studies in Short Fiction, Texas Studies in Literature and Language, Notes and Queries, and Tennessee Studies in Literature. He is presently working on a book on Shakespeare. Peter J. James (B .A . - Hons. - ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 37  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0601/iiicontr.htm
16. Contributors [Journals] [Kronos]
... intelligence, microcomputers, and neuropsychology. He has been a technical writer for the past three years for such diverse firms as IBM, Technicon, and Bell Laboratories. Richard J. Jaarsma (Ph.D ., Rutgers Univ.); Professor of English at the William Paterson College of New Jersey. His previous publications include essays on Shakespeare, Oliver Goldsmith, and T. S. Eliot in such journals as Literature and Psychology, Studies in Short Fiction, Texas Studies in Literature and Language, Notes and Queries, and Tennessee Studies in Literature. He is presently working on a book on Shakespeare. Shulamit Kogan (B .A ., Hunter College; B. ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 37  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0603/iiicontr.htm
... the rqth century we see confusion in their use, for Minsheu mentioned the " astrologers " as having formed the "asterismes," and the diarist John Evelyn wrote of " Mr. Flamsteed the learned astrologer." Contrariwise, and not long previously, the word "astronomer" was applied to those whom we would now call astrologers. Shakespeare devoted his 14th Sonnet to the subject, beginning thus - Not from the stars do I my judgment pluck, And yet methinks I have astronomy; and in Troilus and Cressida we read When he performs astronomers foretell it. But this is a long digression from my subject. Arabia's part in early astronomy was slight, for although the ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 34  -  19 Jun 2005  -  URL: /online/pubs/books/stars/index.htm
... only keep Cardona's warning in mind that mankind has experienced several planetary catastrophes over thousands of years, each of which may be recorded in myth and art.] The importance for Fergusson of establishing structural similarities between Hamlet and Oedipus Rex is that it permits him to draw important connections between the creators of these plays. To him, even though Shakespeare and Sophocles lived many miles and many centuries apart, they both seem to have drawn from the same well. If there is an art of drama in its own right, not derived from the more highly developed arts and philosophies, but based upon a uniquely direct sense of life, then Oedipus Rex and Hamlet are crucial instances of ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 34  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0401/067earth.htm
19. Contributors [Journals] [Kronos]
... , Biblical Archaeology Review, Astronomy, and SIS Review . Mr. Ellenberger is a Contributing Editor of KRONOS, and on the staff of the American Chemical Society. Richard J. Jaarsma (Ph.D ., Rutgers Univ.); Professor of English at the William Paterson College of New Jersey. His previous publications include essays on Shakespeare, Oliver Goldsmith, and T. S. Eliot in such journals as Literature and Psychology, Studies in Short Fiction, Texas Studies in Literature and Language, Notes and Queries, and Tennessee Studies in Literature. He is presently working on a book on Shakespeare. Edward L. Odenwald, III (M .A ., New ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 29  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0504/002contr.htm
... has published, as it undoubtedly will again publish, even longer critiques. [See, for example, the recent criticism by William White which, starting in XI:1 , will appear in three installments.] But for Forrest to ramble on for 10 pages of single-spaced type - approximately 8400 words - with lengthy interjections about his beloved Shakespeare and the manner in which he came to pen his opus magnum is to blow a horn in a meandering tune in discord with the background music. No journal has space to waste on such banality. It is not that Forrest did not raise any valid points - although they are all answerable. But he buried them in a heap ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 29  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol1103/071forum.htm
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