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Search results for: moon in all categories

1767 results found.

177 pages of results.
... well worth while to interrupt our investigation into the problems of the Inter-Andean Altiplano, and of the riddle of Tiahuanaco, in order to get as clear a conception as possible of the tidal phenomenon postulated at the end of the first chapter and of its causation. Our Earth is accompanied on its journey round the Sun by a Satellite, the Moon. How our planet obtained this companion is not known; the only certain thing is that it has not been with the Earth from the very beginning. Speculation as to its origin, or derivation, reveals two possibilities. The first possibility is that the Moon is a child of the Earth, and that it was thrown off by ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 115  -  26 Mar 2007  -  URL: /online/pubs/books/bellamy/flood/02-cosmological.htm
... seasons and other ecologically important events. Others commemorated longer cycles associated with planets and stars. These formed the framework of complex calendric systems against which the basic patterns of religious and civil life were maintained. In the earliest records many of the standard constellations were recognised and used with others to chart the starfield and track the paths of sun, moon, and planets. The early complexity of astronomical lore suggests prehistoric recognition of astronomical cycles and the development of basic techniques of observation. Scholars generally attribute widespread distribution of astronomical traditions and practices to the selective advantage of astronomical time reckoning. Groups which achieved some degree of astronomical skills in timing the change of seasons had a greater chance of ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 114  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0204/029psych.htm
143. Making Moonshine with Hard Science [Journals] [Kronos]
... . But eight digits can be attached to an IQ score, an automobile license, the average height of Americans, the temperature of a frying pan, a tonal harmony in music, a rhythmic sequence in Indian dance, and so on. And if we proceeded to an accuracy of ten digits, or twelve, we might find the moon revolving a bit irregularly, which a genial mechanician such as Professor Michelson might trace back to an old disaster. The important questions are what the number means and what purpose it serves. In the present case, we are led to believe that this eight-digit number will be shown to (a ) have been used or discovered by a ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 114  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0103/052moon.htm
144. A Theory Of Lunar DisturbanceE [Journals] [SIS Review]
... From: SIS Chronology & Catastrophism Review 1998:1 (Sep 1998) Home | Issue Contents A Theory Of Lunar Disturbance by Len Saunders Considerable thought has been given to collisions with Earth and evidence has been adduced for such events within recent history. Because of its proximity it seems reasonable to suppose that the moon has shared Earth's experiences, so it is not unreasonable to imagine that it, too, has suffered recent collisions, or near-collisions. Given the absence of water and atmosphere, its undisturbed ancient surface and its smaller mass, it is possible that evidence of any such events could be less ambiguous than their equivalents on Earth. Glyphs within the chamber passageway at Newgrange ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 113  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/review/v1998n1/13lunar.htm
145. Monitor [Journals] [SIS Review]
... designated 1996TL66 is similar to Pluto and Charon in brightness but has an unusually eccentric orbit. It has been suggested that the gravity of the outer planets disturbs proto-comets from the even more distant Oort Cloud. Another, 1996RQ20, also has a very elliptical orbit and is slightly smaller. 1993SC appears to be related to Pluto and one of Neptune's moons, suggesting that they originated from this region. The connection, believe it or not, is the presence of methane ice and tar-like hydrocarbons. A group of red asteroids apparently freshly ejected from the Kuiper belt into unstable orbits in the outer Solar System have been christened the Centaurs and their red colour is due to a covering of organic ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 113  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/review/v1997n2/39monit.htm
146. Comments on the Second Issue [Journals] [Catastrophist Geology]
... From: Catastrophist Geology Year 2 No. 1 (June 1977) Home | Issue Contents Comments on the Second Issue The Yuty Crater on Mars' by V.Axel Firsoff (CG of Dec. '76, p.47) contains the statement that a body falling from infinity on the surface of the Moon would attain 2.38 km/s " presumably because Firsoff regards the theoretical escape velocity as the upper limit. In fact, a body falling from infinity is rather like a comet and these are known to have velocities of several hundred km/s when they graze the Sun, in which the escape velocity is 619 km/s . In other ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 113  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/catgeo/cg77jun/01comm.htm
147. Making Moonshine with Hard Science [Books] [de Grazia books]
... . But eight digits can be attached to an IQ score, an automobile license, the average height of Americans, the temperature of a frying pan, a tonal harmony in music, a rhythmic sequence of Indian dance, and so on. And if we proceeded to an accuracy of ten digits, or twelve, we might find the moon revolving a bit irregularly, which a genial mechanism such as Professor Michelson might trace back to an old disaster. The important questions are what the number means and what purpose it serves. In the present case, we are held to believe that this eight-digit number will be shown to (a ) have been used or discovered by a ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 113  -  29 Mar 2004  -  URL: /online/pubs/books/degrazia/burning/ch17.htm
148. A Tale Of Two Venuses [Journals] [Velikovskian]
... tail. This is related to the nature of Jupiter's interior, as will be demonstrated below. Henry H. Bauer has attacked Velikovsky because of his prediction of radio noise from Jupiter: 1. . . he coupled the original suggestion with the acknowledgment that Jupiter is cold." ' What Velikovsky wrote was: "In Jupiter and its moons we have a system not unlike the solar family. The planet is cold, yet its gases are in motion. It appears probable to me that it sends out radio noises as do the Sun and stars. I suggest this be investigated." 2 Bauer, however, challenges Velikovsky's prediction with the following: "Yet by 1962 ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 113  -  27 May 2007  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/velikov/vol0402/05tale.htm
149. Eclipses in Ancient Times [Journals] [Pensee]
... critics] argue, precise calculations have established that, from the second millennium before the present era down to our time, the lunar eclipses have been retarded by the infinitesimal and almost exact interval of 1/1 ,000 of a second in a century; this very minute retardation is the result of tidal friction between the Earth and the Moon. The eclipses being so consistent throughout the millennia, there could have been no other changes in the rotation of the Earth nor in the revolution of the Moon during all this time. It is a formidable argument, if it can stand. But does it not remind one of the "pyramidal inch," the minute measurements by ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 112  -  05 Mar 2003  -  URL: /online/pubs/journals/pensee/ivr05/20eclips.htm
... on the peplos were sometimes given the faces of living persons, and it was regarded as an outstanding honour to be considered `worthy of the peplos'. The Greater Panathenaea were a sort of Ionian rival of the Doric Olympian Games. The month of Hecatombaeon was the first month of the Greek civic year which started with the first new moon after the summer solstice. It had its name from the hundred oxen immolated at its end. At the time when the meeting of the philosophical circle is supposed to have taken place, the realities behind the Panathenaean Festival had already been largely forgotten. Note 7. The numbering of the passages of Plato's Atlantis myth, which may seem ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 112  -  26 Mar 2007  -  URL: /online/pubs/books/bellamy/atlantis/notes.htm
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