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Search results for: homer in all categories

328 results found.

33 pages of results.
51. Tiryns [Velikovsky Archive Website]
... be a 500-year throwback to Middle Helladic buildings. 15 When the 8th-7th-century temples were built, the 13th-century palace plans must have been long forgotten, 16 unless some Mycenaean palace managed to survive intact until that time, or unless a ruined palace was cleared and its ground plan was then studied and copied. It is in the context of these two possibilities that Tiryns ? palace becomes so important for those desiring to connect 13th-century palaces with 8th-7th-century temples. 17 The palace of Tiryns has special significance for the Homericists as well. Now that Homer is assigned to the late 8th century while the destruction of the Mycenaean palaces is put in the late 13th, could Homer have been influenced by Bronze Age palaces when he describes them in his Odyssey ?. Since Homer is removed by 500 years from the palaces he described, ? Mycenaean monuments... will thus play no role ? in any attempt to study the architecture that Homer actually knew. 18 So says one archaeologist. Other archaeologists and Homericists disagree. They believe that Homer must have been familiar with at least ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 40  -  31 Aug 2000  -  32k  -  URL: http://www.varchive.org/schorr/tiryns.htm
... From: SIS Chronology and Catastrophism Workshop 1989 No 1 (May 1989) Home¦ Issue Contents Planetary Identities: II The Mythology of Homer by Dwardu Cardona 1. Zeus, Hades, and Poseidon This, the second part of my amiable debate with Chris Boyles turns now to some of his more specific objections. Concerning the planetary identifications I had earlier presented [1, Boyles has stated that my 'deductions are hardly proof of the origins of all deities' [2, but the truth is that I never presented my 'deductions' as such. Right from the start I was careful to stress that my 'deductions' concerned the major deities of the world's great pantheons [3. After all, it must not be forgotten that it was he who had even earlier stated that the astronomical origin of the major gods of antiquity is a premise that has been 'pulled out of a hat' [4. In the friendliest of manners, I would therefore like to challenge Boyles into naming one such major deity who, in his opinion, does not owe his ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 39  -  05 Mar 2003  -  20k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/workshop/w1989no1/04homer.htm
... Jonas, author of The Gnostic Religion, may also be quoted. For he has traced a very old belief in the connection between Moon and Helen: "Some Greek mythological speculation seems to have associated the Homeric Helen with the moon, whether prompted by the similarity of Helene and Selene, or by her fate (abduction and recovery) interpreted as a nature myth, or by Homer's once comparing her appearance to that of Artemis. One story had it that the egg which Leda found dropped from the moon; and the late Homer commentator Eustathius (twelfth century AD) mentions that there are some who say that Helen fell down to Earth from the moon, and that she was taken back up when the will of Zeus was accomplished. When and by whom this was said, Eustathius does not state; neither does he say (or imply) that in this form of the myth Helen served as a symbol of the anima...." (8) The plot of the Iliad, then, would become the plot of the Love Affair ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 36  -  05 Mar 2003  -  62k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v0103/08aphro.htm
... that justify a new approach. Afterwards. we can define in a preliminary way the body of techniques that need to be assembled and developed. The "Burnt City" of Troy In some exciting passages, which have unquestionably been among the most widely read of all archaeological writing, Schliemann describes how, in May of 1873, he uncovered "The Treasure of Priam," King of Troy during the war between the Greeks and Trojans. (Neither his identification of the Treasure as Priam's nor of the City as the Troy of Homer is at issue here, and therefore these problems are passed over lightly.) Schliemann reports (4) that the "Trojans of whom Homer sings" occupied a stratum of debris "from 7 to 10 meters, or 23 to 33 feet, below the surface. This Trojan stratum, which, without exception, bears marks of great heat, consists mainly of red ashes of wood, which rise from 5 to 10 feet above the Great Tower of Ilium, and the great enclosing Wall, the construction of which Homer ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 32  -  05 Mar 2003  -  36k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0104/025paleo.htm
55. 'KA', AND EGYPTIAN MAGIC [Quantavolution Website]
... Quantavolution.Org E-MAIL: contact@quantavolution.org TABLE OF CONTENTS KA by H. Crosthwaite CHAPTER THIRTEEN 'KA', AND EGYPTIAN MAGIC HOMER and the Greek tragic poets often use periphrasis when addressing people. Achilles might be addressed as "strength of Achilles." The words sthenos, is, menos, bia, each meaning force of some kind, are used, also kara and kephale, head. The Latin word vis, strength or quantity, suggests that a digamma was originally present in the Greek word is, and that it was vis. Hesiod, Theogony 332, even refers to Herakles as "is bias Herakleies", and Homer refers to Telemachus as "hiere is Telemachoio", the holy power of Telemachus. Iphi, from is, means 'with might'; iphi anassein means to rule with might. Oidipou kara means simply Oedipus, but literally it is 'head of Oedipus'. Phile kephale, dear head, is used in greeting [1, like the Latin carum caput. Vis, Latin for strength, is personified as Juno by the ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 32  -  03 Apr 2004  -  37k  -  URL: http://www.quantavolution.org/vol_12/ka_13.htm
... place. To understand his victory, it is necessary that we assess his concepts in relation to what his predecessors offered. Three difficulties, however, stand in the way. First, it is risky to discuss the chronology of Greek cosmological thought in the three centuries before Aristotle because much of what is said about the pre-Socratics and the Pythagoreans comes from secondary or tertiary sources (often Aristotle himself). Second, too little place is given in most histories of Greek science to an even more ancient cosmology which can be gleaned from Homer, Hesiod and such playwrights as Aeschylus. Third, even if one were to try to pinpoint when each school began, no firm terminal dates can be assigned to them because their influence persisted for centuries, either as serious topics of debate or as vestiges in religious drama and epic. As a result, it is perhaps wisest to say that, at the time of Aristotle's Lyceum, many different concepts of the origin and nature of the universe existed, attributable to such varied thinkers as Plato and Democritus and Leucippus, or ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 32  -  05 Mar 2003  -  96k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v1993cam/052cat.htm
... researched these festivals. [17 These Saturnian deities, meanwhile, were themselves associated with the Saturnian planet so that Zysman is left to demonstrate what his prehistoric super-auroral rings had to do with that planet. If, as per his scenario, it was the superimposition of these auroral rings around the reflected sunlit Earth in his mirrored canopy that constituted the primeval sun god, whence came the connection with the planet Saturn and its deity that the mytho-historical record alludes to? On a different subject, Derek also found it difficult to accept that Homer 'could write in the manner of our modern poets' and that, in composing the Iliad, the bard included a certain amount of divine intervention 'for good measure'. Here Derek seems to have misunderstood my argument and this was, perhaps, abetted by the fact that the editors of Workshop inadvertently dropped a line from my previous reply. [18. That line was in the form of a question which read: 'Who says that Homer wrote "in the manner of our modern poets"?' The following line- ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 32  -  05 Mar 2003  -  23k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/workshop/w1993no1/14comp.htm
... that justify a new approach. Afterwards, we can define in a preliminary way the body of techniques that needs to be assembled and developed. THE "BURNT CITY" OF TROY In some exciting passages, which have unquestionably been among the most widely read of all archaeological writing, Schliemann describes how, in May of 1873, he uncovered "The treasure of Priam," King of Troy during the war between the Greeks and Trojans. (Neither his identification of the Treasure as Priam's nor of the City as the Troy of Homer is at issue here, and therefore these problems are passed over lightly.) Schliemann reports [5 that the "Trojans of whom Homer sings" occupied a stratum of debris "from 7 to 10 meters, or 23 to 33 feet, below the surface. This Trojan stratum, which, without exception, bears marks of great heat, consists mainly of red ashes of wood, which rise from 5 to 10 feet above the Great Tower of Ilium, and the great enclosing Wall, the construction of which Homer ascribes ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 32  -  03 Apr 2004  -  72k  -  URL: http://www.quantavolution.org/vol_11/burning_of_troy_p1_02.htm
... "won the war" and razed Troy. Whether or not Troy was actually destroyed by the Achaeans cannot be told from the ruins of the city. Troy VI and VIIa are the best candidates for the historical city; Schliemann's Troy (now referred to as Troy IIg) is not regarded anymore as a possibility; I have written of this case in the Book, The Burning of Troy. Troy IIg was destroyed by an atmospheric conflagration; Troy VI by an earthquake; Troy VIIa by an atmospheric conflagration. These, to Homer and his audiences, would be the gods in battle, the effects of "a divine-kindled fire of stones" (Iliad) and other superhuman operations. The "Fall of a City" is a legendary symbol in various cultures for a disaster, that is, the disruption and end of a celestial order. It is likely that the Fall of Troy was such a catastrophe, in which human agency played less of a role than the divine. THE INDESTRUCTIBLE LADY HELEN Some of the Trojan story is reported in the Odyssey ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 32  -  03 Apr 2004  -  25k  -  URL: http://www.quantavolution.org/vol_08/mm_loveaffair_2_06.htm
... twain was made by Pallas Athene, daughter of Zeus, who bears the aegis, in the likeness of Mentor both in form and in voice" [4. Thus ends the Odyssey. Notes (Chapter 1: An Athena Production) 1. William Mullen, "A Reading of the Pyramid Texts," III Pensee No 1 (1973), 10; pp. 13-4. 2. George E. Dimock, Jr., "The Name of Odysseus," in George Steiner and Robert Fagles, eds., Homer: A Collection of Critical Essays, New York: Prentice Hall, 1962, p. 106. 3. The Odyssey, Penguin edition, introduction. 4. A. T. Murray, translator, Homer: The Odyssey, 2 vols. (New-York: Putnam's Sons, 1919), II, 443. Mentor was the lifetime guardian and advisor of Odysseus. He had been left behind when Odysseus sailed for Troy. (All line references to the Greek text will be to the Murray translation.) TABLE OF ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 30  -  03 Apr 2004  -  12k  -  URL: http://www.quantavolution.org/vol_08/mm_loveaffair_1_01.htm
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