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Search results for: homer in all categories

328 results found.

33 pages of results.
281. The Founding of Rome [Catastrophism & Ancient History Journal $]
... century. We are perplexed now and have exhausted our meager supply of information. The most plausible suggestion I can afford is that the Trojan Wars were several in number until the city's final destruction (and we cannot confirm the site of Hissarlik-- Schliemann's discovery-- as more than a frontier post in the struggles). Given the practices of those times, an age of colonizations and restless wanderings having begun, Aeneas, Prince of Troy, led his party of refugees out at an early stage of the wars (which Homer combined into one for literary effect and from amnesiac causes), did visit Dido at the turn of the century, and so history picks up the story with Romulus and Rome's founding in the middle of the next century. We are introducing one doubt in order to relieve ourselves of several. And we should be grateful if some scholar carries the whole scenario down another century to place it squarely in the catastrophic 8th and 7th centuries. We have also relieved ourselves of several notions: that Virgil was only glorifying Rome by mythmaking ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  05 Mar 2003  -  28k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/cat-anc/vol0601/19rome.htm
282. A Question of Logic [Catastrophism & Ancient History Journal $]
... about -700 in order to synchronize it with the Phrygian era. As a result, the Lydian Empire succeeds the Trojans, with the dynasty of Gyges having its beginnings at the time of the Dorian invasions. 11 Not merely content with disposing the three or four hundred year long Greek Dark Age, Velikovsky claims that "the timetables of Crete (Minoan Ages) and of early Greece (Mycenaean ages) are displaced by the same stretch of time by which the Egyptian dates are out of step with the revised chronology." 12 Homer is normally dated around -850, and the Archaic Age between -800 and -500. Here the advice given me is that "Troy fell some time in the late eighth or early seventh century; soon after (one generation, according to Greek tradition) came the end of the Mycenaean Age, separated by only a few decades from the so-called archaic age." 13 Greek history is thus shortened by the Dark Ages and by a further one hundred and fifty years-- the same period as the gap between the Eighteenth and ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  05 Mar 2003  -  33k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/cat-anc/vol0102/67logic.htm
... chroniclers have compressed two thousand years of history into a consecutive narrative which diminishes the timespan? And, for example, could they have placed a fragment of tradition about building Pithom and Raamses into much earlier sequences about a different period in Egypt? Above all, is it credible that they could have been ignorant of a long period of disaster which struck their nation? Certainly, if there was a gap in their traditions it would disappear without a trace very easily. The chroniclers were writing, after all, at the time of Homer, who also gathered a lot of incidental details from his own experience in order to make his ancient tale more vivid. Before him Herodotus, the Father of History, also put the building of the pyramids in quite the wrong place. In any case it seems unreasonable to expect them to use archaic names for districts like Edom and Moab-- and at least part of the argument for the late dating hinges on names such as these. Note on dates: Whether conventional chronology needs to be compressed or Hebrew tradition extended ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  05 Mar 2003  -  35k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/cat-anc/proc2/43brief.htm
284. GODS FIRE: [Quantavolution Website]
... , sevens, and seventies, for example; the repetition of words for emphasis; the use of expressions of salvation and deliverance in the 3rd episode of Moses in Midian, and so forth [3. THE LIMITS OF DISTORTION There was a major difference, however, between the Exodus and other epic accounts. The Exodus began in writing, under the authorship and direction of Moses, then was carried by epic tradition in oral form, and then was revived in written form in the tenth century at which time there was no Homer to reassemble it. So it came together afterwards piece by piece for five hundred years, as sacred history and in writing. In inception and conception, the Exodus was modern; it was to be a sacred written history. Luckily for students of ancient events, the Exodus was from its beginnings a sacred happening so that no despot, no matter how powerful, could afterwards rewrite it with impunity. Apart from the theological miracles that the Books of Moses describe (which we translate into historical and scientific miracles), the ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  03 Apr 2004  -  67k  -  URL: http://www.quantavolution.org/vol_09/gods_fire_app.htm
... The stone (and wood) age might have gone on forever if the surface of the Earth had not been blasted into metals and by metals from the skies. If this is a fact, then mankind would be historically as well as psychologically blessed by the gods. Fountains and springs of water erupted, too, in many places, even where the pre-existing waters had been diverted or buried, so that the gods could be said to have first removed good things and then relented and given them back. The gods, sang Homer, were the givers of all good things. Jupiter took away fire to punish mankind; the god-hero Prometheus stole it and gave it back to man; Zeus enchained and tortured Prometheus eternally for his gift. But the fire remained. We have spoken largely of displacement, identification, projection, and aggression heretofore. Alongside these mechanisms moves habit, the human's answer to the blunting of instinctive behavior during the creation of self-awareness. Outstanding in human behavior is the voluntary and unconsciously motivated repetition of actions in every sphere of life. ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  03 Apr 2004  -  36k  -  URL: http://www.quantavolution.org/vol_10/devine_succession_p1_07.htm
286. The Oracle of Cadmus [Catastrophism & Ancient History Journal $]
... 172. While Temple's work is limited and, indeed, distorted by uniformitarian assumptions, and by his interpretation of great amounts of astronomical myth material to support his "visitors from Sirius" theory, it is a mine of fascinating information and stimulating discussion. This quotation is from his discussion of Stecchini's work (op. cit.) on the oracle centers. 50. Oedipus and Akhnaton, "The Seven-Gated Thebes and the Hundred-Gated Thebes." 51. In his 1876 Homeric Svnchronisms: An Enquiry into the Time and Place of Homer, the great Victorian English Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone developed the thesis that many of the Greek legendary motifs originated in oriental countries and "more especially in Egypt." Gladstone curiously did not think in this connection of the Theban cycle of legends and of the Oedipus drama. (Velikovsky, Oedipus and Akhnaton, op. cit., "Trails over the Sea.") 52. Ibid., "The Seer of Our Time." Velikovsky's chapter title refers to Freud, who so elevated Akhnaton in his Oedipus ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  05 Mar 2003  -  24k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/cat-anc/proc2/01cadmus.htm
... end of the VII Century. We are perplexed now and have exhausted our meager supply of information. The most plausible suggestion I can afford is that the Trojan Wars were several until the city's final destruction (and we cannot confirm the site of Hissarlik- Schliemann's discovery- as more than a frontier post in the struggles). Given the practices of those times, an age of colonization and restless wanderings having begun, Aeneas, Prince of Troy, led his party of refugees out at an early stage of the wars (which Homer combined into one for literary effect and from amnesiac causes), did visit Dido at the turn of the century, and so history picks up with Romulus and the founding of Rome in the middle of the next century. We are introducing one doubt in order to relieve ourselves of several. And we should be grateful if some brilliant scholar carried down the whole scenario by another century to place it squarely in the catastrophic VIII and VII centuries. We have relieved ourselves of several notions: that Virgil was only glorifying Rome by ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  03 Apr 2004  -  34k  -  URL: http://www.quantavolution.org/vol_11/burning_of_troy_p1_03.htm
... , Holocene II, and so forth. Whatever the nomenclature, a revised conception of ancient times is in prospect. Nevertheless I would suggest that we use the theological approach to fix our sights and ask "What gods ruled when?" If a certain god ruled during a certain time, and the same god flourished at the same time in different areas, then the same age could be distinguished in its natural and human condition by the nature of its god. From the blessed gods, all good things flow, just like Homer sang, so all the sciences would achieve inspiration and rejuvenation from a theological division of the ages. If a revival of interest in catastrophe occurs, the sciences of pala-psychology, pala-politics, pala-theology, archaeoastronomy, geology, and history need to reexamine many of their findings an theories. The methodologies employed in ancient studies require both intermeshing and invention. An ideal archaeologist needs to know something of psychology and geo-physics, anthropology and astronomy, the history and science of human management. (I could make the ideal even more impossible, ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  03 Apr 2004  -  35k  -  URL: http://www.quantavolution.org/vol_11/burning_of_troy_p1_05.htm
289. A Terracotta Figurine and a Terracotta Head [Velikovsky Archive Website]
... ? Die Hera von Tiryns ? in Tiryns I (Athens, 1912), p. 83. Higgins, ibid., p. 17; Richter, (1969), p. 229 (cf. above ? Shaft Grave Art: Modern Problems,? n. 11). For remarkable similarities, see C.H. Morgan II, ? The Terracotta Figurines from the North Slope of the Acropolis,? Hesperia 4 (1935), pp. 194-195; Young, (1939), p.194; C.H. Whitman, Homer and the Heroic Tradition (Cambridge, Mass, 1958), p. 52; Benson,(1970), p. 123; Boardman, (1964), pp. 61, 104. For some 400-600-year debates arising from those similarities, see Higgins,(1967), pp. 24 and 141 (references), and Nicholls, (1970), pp. 14-15. For related problems, cf. ns. 10-20 and ? The Religious Center of Mycenae,? 26-34 below. Metropolitan Museum Studies 5 ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  31 Aug 2000  -  29k  -  URL: http://www.varchive.org/schorr/fighead.htm
... activity. The study of religious worship and rituals can view these human activities existentially- for their present functioning, that is. It can view them, too, with their prayers and liturgies, as endless repetitions, enforced through all succeeding generations, of the both terrible and life-saving human-making events of the disastrous periods of human history and pre-history. The development of literature would be another diversion of anxiety. Every people has its songs and dances that sooth the uneasy breast. I studied one song that is found in the Odyssey of Homer, that I call the Love Song of Demodocus. It consists of a hundred lines of poetry describing an opera ballet. I believe that I have discovered in its plot a masking of the terrible planetary encounter between Moon and Mars that I mentioned a moment ago. According to the song, Aphrodite (the Moon Goddess) and Mars (the war god) are making love in the bed of the god Vulcan, who traps them by his electrical genius and then is persuaded to release them by the Earth-god Poseidon. Like ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  03 Apr 2004  -  45k  -  URL: http://www.quantavolution.org/vol_11/burning_of_troy_p5_27.htm
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