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Search results for: homer in all categories

328 results found.

33 pages of results.
251. "The Scandal of Enkomi" [Velikovsky Archive Website]
... of the second millennium B.C., separated by some four centuries from the Nimroud pyxis. 2 A bronze of Enkomi repeats a theme of the Nimroud ivories, representing a woman at a window. ? The conception is so singular, and the similarity of our bronze to the ivory so striking, that there can hardly be much difference of date between the two somewhere about 850-700 B.C.? ? Another surprise among our bronzes is a pair of greaves... It is contended by Reichel 3 that metal greaves are unknown in Homer. He is satisfied that they were the invention of a later age (about 700 B.C.).? Bronze fibulae, too, were found in the Enkomi tombs, as well as a large tripod ? with spiral patterns resembling one in Athens, which is assigned to the Dipylon period,? and a pair of scales of a balance like the one figured on the Arkesilaos vase. But such finds are separated by a wide span of time from the twelfth century. The silver vases of the Enkomi tombs ? are ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  31 Aug 2000  -  33k  -  URL: http://www.varchive.org/dag/enkomi.htm
... , 2, p.738. The dictionary entry for "Kesil" supports this association of "Orion" with Saturn. Two meaning are given: a fool, with overtones of infidelity; and Orion- a wicked individual chained to heaven. Comments Gaster (op. cit., II, 790): "The Hebrew word for 'Orion' (viz. 'K'sil') means properly 'a lumbering gawk, clod' (not simply 'fool', as commonly rendered)... In Classical tradition Orion was a giant. Homer speaks of him as 'prodigious in size', and he is so portrayed in Greek art. Latin writers called him 'gigas', and in Arabic literature he is termed analogously 'the Giant' ('al jabber')." We have here a motif of great impact and significance discernable in many mythologies. De Santillana and von Dechend (op. cit., pp. 177-8) also refer to "the figure of Orion the blind giant, called also Nimrod the Hunter, brandishing the Hyades, working the Mill of the ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  05 Mar 2003  -  48k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v0104/17job.htm
253. In Defence of the Revised Chronology [SIS C&C Review $]
... texts and the Old Testament in no way require that they are exactly contemporaneous." As the various books of the Old Testament were written over a period of 1100 years, this is a meaningless statement. An "exact contemporaneity" between Ras Shamra and Amenhotep II's time with that of Asa of Judah is supported by the following: "The sepulchral chambers of Ugarit influenced the architecture of sepulchral chambers on Cyprus- but not until more than half a millennium had elapsed. The naval catalogue of Ugarit reappeared in the epic creations of Homer after an interlude of several centuries. Jewels identical with those of Ugarit were worn by maidens of Jerusalem six or seven hundred years after the destruction of Ugarit. The poetic style and meter, the legal ordinances and sacerdotal practices, even the system or weights, re-emerged after an equally long period. Dividing strokes between written words were introduced into the script of Cyprus some seven hundred years after the script Of Ras Shamra with the same characteristics had fallen into oblivion." 1. I. Velikovsky, "Ages in Chaos" ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  05 Mar 2003  -  24k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v0102/14defen.htm
254. Reconsidering Velikovsky [SIS C&C Workshop $]
... Greeks themselves with their genealogy from the fall of Troy to the first Olympiad. Benny does not believe in the reliability of the Olympic visitor list, but has the start of the Olympic Games at the turn of the 6th century BC. He went on to confirm that there is no gap between Bronze and Iron Age strata, when the 'Dark Ages' are supposed to have occurred. He reminded us of the dependence of early dating on a false correlation with Egyptian history. He referred to the work of Schaeffer and Findlay and Homer as well as the Greek story of Deukalion, all providing proof of ancient catastrophes, such as the report that the Olympic Games were founded 50 years after Deukalion's flood, and in fact, the prehistoric site of Olympia was twice destroyed by floods. There has been no recent attempt by orthodox science to correlate archaeology and tradition, which is what Benny Peiser does, concluding that Greek history began in the 6th century BC, rather than the generally accepted 12th century or earlier. Professor Heinsohn, showing us a vivid picture of ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  05 Mar 2003  -  19k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/workshop/w1990no2/28recon.htm
... seem to put it beyond comparison with any feature of the Moon we have discussed (except, perhaps, the lunar-highland deposit that blankets more than half of the Moon). But it is well to remember that Mars tangled with Venus and with the Earth, too, according to Velikovsky. I can only wonder: Is it possible that Mars was bled of several million cubic kilometers of soil and rock in a single encounter with another planetary body? Might the Canyonlands of Mars have been created in an event perhaps hinted at by Homer when he wrote: "Athena [Venus) drove the spear straight into his [Ares' (Mars') belly where the kilt was girded: the point ran in and tore the flesh.... [and Ares roared like a trumpet.... (137)? An Anode Role for Mars It remains to be shown that the planet Mars, probably carrying twice the negative charge of the Moon as the two bodies first approached one another, could have become the anode (positive electrode) in ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  05 Mar 2003  -  87k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/pensee/ivr10/27moon2.htm
256. The Scandal of Enkomi [Pensee]
... " But how could this be if Enkomi dates from the 14th or 15th Century? A bronze of Enkomi repeats a theme of the Nimrud ivories, representing a woman at a window. "The conception is so singular, and the similarity of our bronze to the ivory so striking, that there can hardly be much difference of date between the two-somewhere about 850-700 B.C." "Another surprise among our bronzes is a pair of greaves.... It is contended by Reichel (2) that metal greaves are unknown in Homer. He is satisfied that they were the invention of a later age (about 700 B.C.)." Bronze fibulae, too, were found in the Enkomi tombs, as well as a large tripod "with spiral patterns resembling one in Athens, which is assigned to the Dipylon period," and a pair of scales of a balance like the one figured on the Arkesilaos vase. But such finds are separated by a wide span of time from the fourteenth century. The silver vases of the Enkomi tombs "are ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  05 Mar 2003  -  21k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/pensee/ivr10/21enkomi.htm
257. Olympia [Velikovsky Archive Website]
... he wrong? The Geometric Age belongs to the first millennium, argued the other scholar (Furtwaengler), and was he wrong? Wrong was their common borrowing of dates for the Mycenaean Age from the Egyptologists. In view of the fact that later generations of archaeologists followed Furtwaengler and not Dörpfeld, it is worthwhile to reproduce the assessment of the latter as an archaeologist by one who knew him and his work, herself a great figure in classical studies built on Mycenaean and Classical archaeology, H. L. Lorimer, author of Homer and the Monuments (1950). In her Preface to that book Lorimer writes: I wish to record the debt which in common with all Homeric archaeologists I owe to a great figure, forgotten to-day in some quarters and in others the object of an ill-informed contempt. To Wilhelm Dörpfeld, the co-adjutor of Schliemann in his later years and long associated with the German Aracheological Institute in Athens, scholars owe not only the basic elucidation of the sites of Tiryns and Troy which ensured their further fruitful exploration, but the establishment of ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  31 Aug 2000  -  19k  -  URL: http://www.varchive.org/dag/olympia.htm
... to a 10 degree tilt of the earth's axis, corrected the axis shift of 721 B.C. "So the sun returned ten degrees, by which degrees it was gone down," reads Isaiah 38.8. From one continent to another men, oppressed with terror, watched Mars battle Venus in the sky, speed fiercely toward the Earth bringing blasts of fire, retreat and engage Venus once more. Perhaps the most startling literary account of this theomachy, or battle of gods, is contained in Homer's Iliad (Velikovsky's revised chronology places Homer later than 747 B.C.) As the Greeks besieged Troy, Athena (Venus) "would utter her loud cry. And over against her spouted Ares (Mars), dread as a dark whirlwind... All the roots of many-founted Ida were shaken, and all her peaks." The river "rushed with surging flood" and "The fair streams seethed and boiled." Venus and Mars both emerged from the battle defeated. Mars was "thrown out of the ring"; and Venus, once having ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  05 Mar 2003  -  19k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/pensee/ivr01/08collis.htm
259. Society News [SIS C&C Review $]
... single combat. If we push the Greek Age of Heroes back to 900 BC it makes no sense. The archaeology etc. points to the 8th-7th centuries BC. Bob Porter asked about the Greek list and genealogy for Sparta. Benny said it was created in the 4th century- 'all sons of gods and not historical'. Bob asked about the earliest Greek date. Benny said it was difficult to say- historical consciousness started in c. 450 with Herodotus, who said the Trojan war was 800 years before his time and Homer 400 but there are no documents to back this up. Emmett commented this was using the Spartan king list and counting 40 years a generation. Bob asked if Greek king lists could be used; Benny said they could not. Bob asked about the Hittite civil war ending in 1200 BC on the conventional dating. James knocked out 250 years, bringing that down to neo-Hittite and Rohl another 100, overlapping Hittite and neo-Hittite. Benny asked how we were to evaluate king lists? Bob did not think there is a Hittite king ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  05 Mar 2003  -  30k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v1996n1/60soc.htm
260. Society News [SIS C&C Workshop $]
... goddess holding aloft snakes in both hands and hoped that by the end of his talk we would all be able to interpret the meaning of the figure. He made no claim to originality in the idea that much of the iconography and religion of the ancient world could be understood in terms of electrical effects (recent books on the subject which members will probably have come across are Yahweh by J. Ziegler and God's Fire by Alfred de Grazia) but would survey the evidence of the vocabulary used by the experts. The writings of Homer and later Greek tragedians indicate that, just as the Greeks were particularly aware of the separate parts of the body, so they separated aspects of the mind in a way unfamiliar to us today. The ancient Egyptians employ parallel descriptions which also shed light on important words in Etruscan, Latin and Hebrew. The Egyptian word for a man's double, also used for 'bull', is Ka. There are linguistic similarities to the kerukeion, the staff used by the Greek Hermes, and the caduceus, the staff carried by the ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 4  -  05 Mar 2003  -  25k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/workshop/w1991no2/01news.htm
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