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Search results for: deluge in all categories

396 results found.

40 pages of results.
61. Letters [Velikovsky Archive Website]
... meteoric nature. Therefore I have urgently advised and I repeat it here that the orientation of the rocks before their removal should be noticed and marked. Meteorites would fall at random and would not be all similarly oriented. You said to me that this simple task of marking the orientation is not included in the program; if it will be omitted you will have a question instead of an answer. You expect ice under the upper layer of the crust. Some nine thousand years ago water was showered on Earth and Moon alike (deluge). But on the Moon all of it dissociated, hydrogen escaping; the rocks will be found rich in oxygen, chlorine, sulfur and iron. Moon has no oceans and no marine life: water covered it only for a very limited time (following the deluge) counted in hundreds of years. Nevertheless I maintain bitumen and other hydrocarbon residues and derivatives will be discovered on the Moon, though not necessarily on the first landing: such discovery will be followed by the claim that rich marine life once existed on the ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 30  -  31 Aug 2000  -  3k  -  URL: http://www.varchive.org/cor/hess/690702vh.htm
... , by showing that Newton, Halley, and their followers continued to embrace key tenets of popular lore despite their hostility to vulgar astrological predictions...Where comets had portended revolution, religious reform, and agricultural change, Halley and Newton now made them active agents. In their theories, historical, sacred, and geological periods were punctuated by cometary catastrophes." [9 While arguing her case, Genuth provides a good overview of such theorists as William Whiston, who held that the close approach of a great comet was responsible for the Deluge. Whiston's views, as it turns out, were fairly common in the Cambridge circle. Newton and Halley shared very similar views, in fact. Although her subject was the period prior to the 19th century, Genuth includes a brief appendix on modern day attempts to resurrect cometary catastro-phism as an important factor in the evolution (and extinction) of life on Earth. Here she summarizes the theories of Walter Alvarez et al, Fred Hoyle, and others. Sadly, Genuth does not mention Velikovsky or his seminal influence on so ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 30  -  05 Mar 2003  -  8k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0504/93comet.htm
63. The Acceptance of Correct Ideas in Science [Velikovsky Archive Website]
... and the Koran? Why do students of geology strain themselves to explain, or explain away, catastrophically-formed phenomena they observe on the bottoms of the seas, in mountain ridges, in great fields of lava, and great deserts? I have called this psychological phenomenon collective amnesia. and I have explained the term elsewhere: it is not that we have no historical evidence: it is rather the inability to read the texts as they are — Mars for Mars, Jupiter for Jupiter, fire for fire, hurricane for hurricane, and deluge for deluge. To elaborate on this subject and to show how the unconscious mind works in all areas of our activities, even in our many sporadic wars, I have written Mankind in Amnesia. If Jung was right in his concept of a collective unconscious mind, then its probing must reveal the persistent racial memories of great catastrophes of the past when the sea, the sky, and the earth competed in destruction — for we are “survivors of survivors.” Are there no other reasons for the outcry and concerted opposition ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 30  -  31 Aug 2000  -  17k  -  URL: http://www.varchive.org/ce/accept.htm
... , the Coricancha. The testimony of Cieza de Leon is substantially the same. The Coricancha is, according to him, "as old as the city of Cuzco", and is dedicated to the worship of the Sun. Cristobal de Molina, a Spanish friar, wrote his Chronicle about the year 1573. He traces the cult of the Sun back to the reign of the first Inca, Manco Capac, and relates the first appearance of the Sun, together with that of the Moon, to the time immediately following the Deluge, these luminaries having been placed in the sky by the Creator. Manco Capac, who lived in the first post-diluvian era, made a covenant with the Sun that he and his descendants would adopt this luminary as their divine parent. Whether the Sun was the chief object of worship at this time is, however, open to question, since one of Manco Capac's descendants, Inca Yupanqui, is said to have built up the Temple of Viracocha in Cuzco, which before him had been small and poor, having been inspired ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 30  -  05 Mar 2003  -  19k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0902/021cosmo.htm
... once change their situation, and were at first in another posture from what they are now, till that inclination happen'd; This the Ancient Philosophers often made mention of, as Anaxagoras, Empedocles, Diogenes, Leucippus, Democritus [2; as may be seen in Laertius, and in Plutarch; and the Stars, they say, at first were carried about the Earth in a more uniform manner. This is no more than we have observ'd and told you in other words, namely that the Earth chang'd its posture at the Deluge, and thereby made these seeming changes in the Heavens; its Poles before pointed to the Ecliptik, which now point to the Poles of the Æquator, and its Axis is become parallel with that Axis; and this is the mystery and interpretation of what they say in other terms; this makes the different aspect of the Heavens, and of its Poles. And I am apt to think, that those changes in the course of the Stars, which the Ancients sometimes speak of, and especially the Ægyptains, if they ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 30  -  05 Mar 2003  -  10k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v1999n1/44mammth.htm
... and the Koran? Why do students of geology strain themselves to explain, or explain away, catastrophically-formed phenomena they observe on the bottoms of the seas, in mountain ridges, in great fields of lava, and great deserts? I have called this psychological phenomenon collective amnesia, and I have explained the term elsewhere: it is not that we have no historical evidence; it is rather the inability to read the texts as they are- Mars for Mars, Jupiter for Jupiter, fire for fire, hurricane for hurricane, and deluge for deluge. To elaborate on this subject and to show how the unconscious mind works in all areas of our activities, even in our many sporadic wars, I have written Mankind in Amnesia. If Jung was right in his concept of a collective unconscious mind, then its probing must reveal the persistent racial memories of great catastrophes of the past when the sea, the sky, and the earth competed in destruction- for we are "survivors of survivors".(4) Are there no other reasons for the outcry ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 30  -  05 Mar 2003  -  18k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0902/039role.htm
67. Volcanism And Catastrophic Mythology [SIS C&C Workshop $]
... to engender the eruptive elements of ancient world-wide mythologies. The most outstanding recent attempt to explain a wide variety of mythological elements began in 1939 with Professor Marinatos. He postulated that the gigantic eruption of the Thera volcano, which involved a caldera collapse, was directly responsible for the destruction of the Minoan civilisation on Crete in the Bronze Age. This has led to further speculation by Galanopoulos and others that this supposed destruction of Crete could have been the source of the Atlantis story and, further, that the plagues of Egypt and the deluge of Deukalion could refer to the same catastrophic event. At first sight the enormous range of damage which can be inflicted by an active volcano might seem more than sufficient for a catastrophic mythology. The most common view of volcanic lava flows destroying everything in their path is in fact a very limited one. In addition to, or instead of lava, volcanoes produce broken rock, ash, dust, superheated gases and steam. They may be preceded by earthquakes and be so violent that they blow the top off their magma chamber ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 30  -  05 Mar 2003  -  14k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/workshop/vol0602/07volc.htm
68. Saturnists Play Marbles [SIS Internet Digest $]
... relevancy or consistency with the Saturn theory? Dwardu Replies: I can only speak for myself. No- not "all mythology" has yet been considered in regard to the Saturn theory. Yes- in MY case, there is still an awful lot of mythological material that has not yet been checked (or not checked well enough). Ev Cochrane Adds: I would agree with Dwardu here. While I am not aware of any major mythological themes that have not been "assimilated" to the Saturn theory --dragon combat, deluge, dying god, warrior hero, ancient sun-god, clown, etc.--it stands to reason that there must be some. Eric: I am assuming that if the answer is that most important mythological traditions have indeed been considered it is because those are regarded as the oldest and most reliable ones to testthe theory on. Dwardu: Correct. Ev: Again I would agree with Dwardu with the caveat that myths first committed to writing in relatively recent times --such as the Irish traditions surrounding Cuchulainn-- often preserve very old ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 30  -  05 Mar 2003  -  11k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/i-digest/1998-2/18saturn.htm
69. On Fermor's article on ante-diluvian climate [Catastrophism & Ancient History Journal $]
... From: Catastrophism and Ancient History II:2 (Jun 1980) Home¦ Issue Contents Interaction On Fermor's article on ante-diluvian climate John P. Pseudonym There are a number of things I'd like to say in reply to the Fermor article on ante-diluvian climate (C&AH, August 1978): Fermor's approach is not that of the Catastrophist, yet he accepts the idea of a Universal Deluge. He advocates the idea that a warm climate is evidenced by "fossil evidence that in preglacial times there were warmer conditions in high altitudes [sic and wetter conditions in present-day deserts." (I'm sure latitudes was meant, not altitudes.) This argument, explaining the presence of corals and coal deposits under the polar ice-clad regions, is the Uniformitarian theory and unfortunately is still in vogue. The same theory has been disputed by several Uniformitarians, notably Hapgood (Path of the Pole, Chilton, 1970, Chap. 3), whose theory of a wandering pole and lithospheric displacements explain all the facts better than the orthodox theory. The work done on ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 30  -  05 Mar 2003  -  7k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/cat-anc/vol0202/117ante.htm
70. The Lesser Light [Catastrophism & Ancient History Journal $]
... , it is improbable that the moon sprang from it; there must have existed a solid lithosphere, not a liquid earth. Thus it is more probable that the moon was captured by the earth. 7 The truth of this argument might only imply that the term as used in Genesis describes more recent conditions. However, in conjunction with the lack of a reference to months, we see a strong suggestion that the Lesser Light was not the moon. The first biblical reference to months is in relation to the chronology of the Deluge. This implies that the moon was no stranger to man at that time, and there appears to be no earlier biblical allusion to its introduction. We must look elsewhere for a more definitive contrast between the Lesser Light and the moon. A Diminished Light The connection we seek resides in various traditions suggesting that the nature of the moon was not always the same as we know it. From the Bomitaba in Africa: "Once upon a time there were two suns, the one we have and the moon. It was ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 30  -  05 Mar 2003  -  12k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/cat-anc/vol0302/114light.htm
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