Catastrophism.com
Man, Myth & Mayhem in Ancient History and the Sciences
Archaeology astronomy biology catastrophism chemistry cosmology geology geophysics
history linguistics mythology palaeontology physics psychology religion Uniformitarianism
Home  | Browse | Sign-up


Search All | FAQ

Where:
  
Suggested Subjects
archaeologyastronomybiologycatastrophismgeologychemistrycosmologygeophysicshistoryphysicslinguisticsmythologypalaeontologypsychologyreligionuniformitarianismetymology

Suggested Cultures
EgyptianGreekSyriansRomanAboriginalBabylonianOlmecAssyrianPersianChineseJapaneseNear East

Suggested keywords
datingspiralramesesdragonpyramidbizarreplasmaanomalybig bangStonehengekronosevolutionbiblecuvierpetroglyphsscarEinsteinred shiftstrangeearthquaketraumaMosesdestructionHapgoodSaturnDelugesacredsevenBirkelandAmarnafolkloreshakespeareGenesisglassoriginslightthunderboltswastikaMayancalendarelectrickorandendrochronologydinosaursgravitychronologystratigraphicalcolumnssuntanissantorinimammothsmoonmale/femaletutankhamunankhmappolarmegalithicsundialHomertraditionSothiccometwritingextinctioncelestialprehistoricVenushornsradiocarbonrock artindianmeteorauroracirclecrossVelikovskyDarwinLyell

Other Good Web Sites

Society for Interdisciplinary Studies
The Velikovsky Encyclopedia
The Electric Universe
Thunderbolts
Plasma Universe
Plasma Cosmology
Science Frontiers
Indexed Web sites
Lobster magazine

© 2001-2004 Catastrophism.com
ISBN 0-9539862-1-7
v1.2


Sign-up | Log-in


Introduction | Publications | More

Search results for: comet in all categories

1158 results found.

116 pages of results.
211. Sagan's "Ten Plagues" [Kronos $]
... never seen stones falling from the sky. Getting down to specifics, Sagan recounts how certain nineteenth century astronomers (whom he characterizes as "early astronomers") thought Jupiter must be the source of the so-called short-period comets with aphelia near the Jovian orbit. But, says Sagan, "this is an unnecessary hypothesis" because perturbations of long-period comets by Jupiter can result in their capture into short-period orbits by the giant planet. His audience, of course, is to infer that "unnecessary" means untrue. The rules change for Comet Venus, however. Sagan informs us that if Venus was ever a short-period comet on an orbit that endangered the Earth, there would have been "a high probability of a close approach to Jupiter which would eject the object from the solar system before a near-encounter with the Earth.. ." No quarter shall be given Velikovsky. By Sagan's reckoning, the very minimum energy required to eject Venus from Jupiter, assuming an escape velocity for the latter of "about 70 km/sec," would amount to approximately 10 ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 52  -  05 Mar 2003  -  52k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0302/083plagu.htm
212. Precursors [Kronos $]
... when I came across their books, and it went far beyond the ideas of these authors. The first of them is William Whiston (1667-1752), professor at Cambridge, who succeeded Newton there. Newton chose him as his successor but later opposed his being admitted as a member of the Royal Society of which Newton was the first president. In 1696 Whiston wrote a book, A New Theory of the Earth from its Origin to the Consumption of All Things, in which he tried to prove that the Earth had contacted a comet which was the cause of the Deluge. He did not explain how a comet could cause a flood, and apparently ascribed this to the displacement of the seas. The idea that the Deluge was caused by a comet was not his: it is mentioned in the Talmud and used by Rashi (Rabbi Isaac ben Solomon), a Mediaeval rabbinical author often quoted by Christian authors during the Renaissance.(10) A mention of the presence of a comet in the sky during the Deluge, though not described as its cause ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 52  -  05 Mar 2003  -  21k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0701/048precu.htm
213. Sagan's Folly Part 1 [Kronos $]
... evidence compiled by Velikovsky in Earth in Upheaval was completely ignored by Sagan. Worse still, the very existence of the book was not even acknowledged. The whole purpose of Earth in Upheaval was to provide independent evidence for Worlds in Collision from the record of stones and bones. Yet, astronomy once again snubs geology. Sagan (p. 20): When Sagan finally comes to "Velikovsky's Principal Hypothesis", his errors begin to mount with alarming rapidity. For example: "The Vermin described in Exodus are produced by the comet --flies and perhaps scarabs [sic drop out of the comet, while indigenous terrestrial frogs are induced by the heat of the comet to multiply." The reader is invited to find where in Worlds in Collision Velikovsky refers to "scarabs" dropping out of the comet. It is a fabrication by Sagan, pure and simple --the product of his own exo-biological imagination. What is also interesting is to contrast Sagan's AAAS statement--"indigenous terrestrial frogs are induced by the heat of the comet to multiply" (emphasis added ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 52  -  05 Mar 2003  -  56k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0302/062sagan.htm
... and Comets The archetypal image of the witch is that of an old crone flying through the night on her broom with disheveled hair, spreading evil throughout the land. Certainly it is difficult to reconcile this image with the current peaceful movements of the planet Venus. Throughout our investigation, however, we have been open to the possibility that the ancient skies may have been different than our own. Confronted with the goddesses' appearance as a fire-breathing dragon, for example, we suggested as a point of comparison the image of a spectacular comet, one associated in some way with the planet Venus, it being known that comets were compared to dragons thoughout the ancient world. (49) Certain elements of the witches' imagery are also consistent with the appearance of a comet. Thus it is well-known that numerous cultures compared the image of a comet to that of a woman with long-streaming or disheveled hair. In Comet, Carl Sagan observed: A comet suggests flowing tresses... When we see a picture of a comet some of us are immediately reminded of ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 52  -  05 Mar 2003  -  36k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0103/097venus.htm
215. Aphrodite Urania [Aeon Journal $]
... Phrygian Cybele offers a classic example of the goddess as mourner. According to Diodorus, the goddess wandered the world with disheveled hair while lamenting the death of Attis. [43 Significantly, Cybele was identified with Aphrodite. [44 There is good reason to think that Diodorus' account preserves archetypal motifs of great significance, as the mourning goddess' habit of wandering around with flowing hair forms a recurring feature in ancient myth. The Greek Electra, for example, is said to have loosed her hair and streamed across heaven as a comet while lamenting the destruction of Troy. Electra's plight is recounted as follows: "But after the conquest of Troy and the annihilation of its descendants...overwhelmed by pain she separated from her sisters and settled in the circle named artic, and over long periods she would be seen lamenting, her hair streaming. That brought her the name of comet." [45 As Carl Sagan observed, a goddess with flowing hair is a perfectly natural interpretation of a comet: "When we see a picture of a comet some of ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 52  -  05 Mar 2003  -  86k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0502/43aphro.htm
216. Venus in Ancient Myth and Language [Aeon Journal $]
... It is a curious fact, one little noticed by the scholarly community as a whole, that the vast majority of the world's great goddesses were identified with the planet Venus. This is the case with the Sumerian Inanna, Babylonian Ishtar, Canaanite Astarte, Egyptian Isis, and Greek Aphrodite, for example. (1) Following the lead of Immanuel Velikovsky, who, in Worlds in Collision, proposed that the planet Venus had recently assumed a comet-like orbit, Talbott and I attempted to reconstruct the history of this most unusual "comet." (2) We found a consistent connection of a comet-like Venus with Saturn, reflected in the earliest astronomical and religious texts alike, a connection which we interpreted as having developed at the time when Saturn reigned supreme in the skies as the central sun. Indeed, we were able to point to a time when Venus orbited the massive Saturn, its comet-like tail presenting the appearance of a giant band encircling Saturn. It was the unique relationship of Venus with Saturn, in our opinion, which accounted in large part ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 52  -  05 Mar 2003  -  51k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0101/02venus.htm
217. Monitor [SIS C&C Workshop $]
... dawn or dusk produced by a full or new Moon. It was little surprise, therefore, to find that the major earthquake of October 17th 1989 near San Francisco happened at dusk, near the time of a full Moon and approaching the peak of what is proving to be an extremely active sunspot cycle. John Gribbin daringly sticks his neck out once again to point out these correlations and to predict that the next danger time will be at the height of the next sunspot cycle at the turn of the century. 'Planet is a Comet' source: New Scientist 13.5.89, p. 35 Chiron, which astronomers have always thought of as a minor planet, orbits the Sun once every 50.7 years in an eccentric orbit (varying from 8.5 to 19 A.U. from the Sun) which lies between those of the gas giant planets Saturn and Uranus. Recent observations at Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona have shown that Chiron not only travels in a comet-like orbit, it also possesses a faint gaseous head, or coma. If Chiron can now be added to the ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 48  -  05 Mar 2003  -  37k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/workshop/w1989no2/21monit.htm
218. Precursors [Velikovsky Archive Website]
... when I came across their books, and it went far beyond the ideas of these authors. The first of them is William Whiston (1667-1752), professor at Cambridge, who succeeded Newton there. Newton chose him as his successor but later opposed his being admitted as a member of the Royal Society of which Newton was the first president. In 1696 Whiston wrote a book, A New Theory of the Earth from its Original to the Consumption of All Things, in which he tried to prove that the Earth had contacted a comet which was the cause of the Deluge. He did not explain how a comet could cause a flood, and apparently ascribed this to the displacement of the seas. The idea that the Deluge was caused by a comet was not his: it is mentioned in the Talmud and used by Rashi (Rabbi Isaac ben Solomon), a Mediaeval rabbinical author often quoted by Christian authors during the Renaissance. (10) A mention of the presence of a comet in the sky during the Deluge, though not described as its cause ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 48  -  31 Aug 2000  -  25k  -  URL: http://www.varchive.org/ce/precursors.htm
... greatness when with one hip of thine the earth was shadowed." Griffith compares this passage to another in which Indra announces: "One side of me is in the sky, and I have drawn the other down." Gonda, similarly, cites I:103:1, which likewise places a part of Indra in heaven and the rest over earth. Here Gonda points out that, "both parts combine so as to form a ketu (which may mean 'ensign', but also 'an unusual phenomenon such as a comet or meteor')." The unusual apparition associated with Indra's ketu, quite possibly, was a string of fiery meteorites hovering over the Earth like the proverbial sword of Damocles, thus uniting, as it were, heaven and earth. If Indra was the planet Mars, as the evidence seems to indicate, we have here an apparent reference to meteorites being strung out between Mars and the Earth. Also relevant here is Indra's intimate association with the Maruts, described in the Rig Veda as a celestial troop, as " ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 48  -  21 Mar 2007  -  37k  -  URL: http://www.kronia.com/thoth/ThoIII02.txt
... THOTH A Catastrophics Newsletter VOL II, No. 16 Oct 15, 1998 EDITOR: Amy Acheson PUBLISHER: Michael Armstrong LIST MANAGER: Brian Stewart CONTENTS HERONS AND CORMORANTS............ Amy Acheson THE COMET VENUS AND THE COMPARATIVE METHOD. .Dave Talbott ANCIENT FLYING MACHINES.. .excerpts from the kronia list MORE ON INTRINSIC REDSHIFTS........ .Wal Thornhill---- HERONS AND CORMORANTS by Amy Acheson Herons stand in shallow water for hours, waiting for dinner to swim by. Cormorants perch on driftwood and pilings, hanging their wings out to dry like miniature Batman signals. Seagulls drop clams and crabs on the rocks to break open their shells. Each is displaying behavior that is part of both their day-to-day survival and their definition as a species. What behavior defines the human species? For one thing, humans fantasize. They make up stories-- fiction, if you will-- to explain the world around them. And they find ways; art, drama, books ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 48  -  21 Mar 2007  -  24k  -  URL: http://www.kronia.com/thoth/ThotII16.txt
Result Pages: << Previous 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 Next >>


Search took 0.070 seconds

Search powered by Zoom Search Engine