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Search results for: big bang in all categories

340 results found containing all search terms.

34 pages of results.
61. Halton Arp: A Modern-Day Galileo [Thunderbolts Website]
... is a must read since it is both educational and hard-hitting while being readable and entertaining. Writing eye-opening material in more than one arena, Arp takes on the corruption of good science in academia, government and publishing after giving us great material concerning red shift, the Big Bang, and cosmology. The book Seeing Red can be ordered via the link. Order Link Nov 02, 2005 Halton Arp: A Modern Day Galileo Halton Arp is to the 21st century what Galileo was to the 17th. Both were respected scientists, popular ... in their field. Both made observations which contradicted the accepted theories. Seventeenth century academics felt threatened by Galileo's observations and so, backed by ecclesiastical authority, they ordered him to stop looking. Twentieth century astronomers felt threatened by Arp's observations and so, backed by institutional authority, they ordered him to stop looking. Both refused. Both published works geared to the non-specialist when specialists would no longer take note. Galileo's paper, "A Dialogue on the Two Chief Systems of the World", favored a heliocentric model of the solar ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 570  -  29 Nov 2006  -  10k  -  URL: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2005/arch05/051102arp-galileo.html
62. There never was a "crater"! [Science Frontiers Website]
... the universe expanded, new matter was continuously created, and thus the density of matter stayed about constant in time. This Steady State Universe was kicked around for a while but ultimately consigned to the cosmological wastebasket. Now, the idea is being revived as the prevailing Big Bang Universe runs into problems, which have been documented perhaps too thoroughly in past issues of SF. The revised steady state model has jettisoned the idea of continuous creation in favor of many discrete "creation events," which will doubtless be called "little bangs ... " They also fill space with small metallic needles which absorb microwaves and reemit the uniform microwave background. The new theory needs more work, but Hoyle and his colleagues write in the June 20 issue of the Astrophysical Journal: "This paper is not intended to give a finished view of cosmology. It is intended rather to open the door to a new view which at present is blocked by a fixation with big bang cosmology." (Crosswell, Ken; "Return of the Steady State Universe," New Scientist, p ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 570  -  29 Apr 2005  -  5k  -  URL: http://www.science-frontiers.com/sf088/sf088a06.htm
... http://www.kronia.com/thoth/thoVII05.txt) Analysis of the light from the four outside bright spots shows a high redshift (designated by “z”) of 1.73. The light from the inner bright spot shows a z of only 0.31. In the Big Bang theory, z is a measure of distance, so the four outside bright spots must be far away (astronomically speaking) and the inside bright spot must be nearby. The alignment is coincidental. However, such a close configuration of four objects at the ... reaches of the universe incidentally lining up around a nearby object is not likely. Another theory supplies another possibility: In General Relativity, light passing near a massive object will be bent, much as light is bent as it passes through a lens. The effect has even been named “gravitational lensing”. If the nearby object were massive enough and a far object were aligned directly behind the nearby object along our line of sight, the gravity of the nearby object could bend the light of the far object into four virtual images ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 570  -  29 Nov 2006  -  11k  -  URL: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2005/arch05/050909tangleweb.html
64. Halton Arp: A Modern-Day Galileo [Thunderbolts Website]
... is a must read since it is both educational and hard-hitting while being readable and entertaining. Writing eye-opening material in more than one arena, Arp takes on the corruption of good science in academia, government and publishing after giving us great material concerning red shift, the Big Bang, and cosmology. The book Seeing Red can be ordered via the link. Order Link Nov 01, 2004 Halton Arp: A Modern Day Galileo Halton Arp is to the 21st century what Galileo was to the 17th. Both were respected scientists, popular ... in their field. Both made observations which contradicted the accepted theories. Seventeenth century academics felt threatened by Galileo's observations and so, backed by ecclesiastical authority, they ordered him to stop looking. Twentieth century astronomers felt threatened by Arp's observations and so, backed by institutional authority, they ordered him to stop looking. Both refused. Both published works geared to the non-specialist when specialists would no longer take note. Galileo's paper, "A Dialogue on the Two Chief Systems of the World", favored a heliocentric model of the solar ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 570  -  29 Nov 2006  -  10k  -  URL: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2004/arch/041101arp-galileo.html
65. Big Bang Distortions [Thunderbolts Website]
... picture of the day resources team a role for you contact us Credit: Halton Arp, Seeing Red home pic of the day archive subject index abstract archive Links: Holoscience Electric Cosmos The Universe Plasma Cosmology Society for Interdisciplinary Studies educational resources Aeon Journal Feb 14, 2005 Big Bang Distortions Halton Arp's intrinsic redshift observations contradict the big bang's assumption that redshift is a measure of distance (and thus of age; the higher the redshift, the farther away from us and the closer to the beginning of the universe). Can this contradiction ... tested? Three clues should be obvious: if redshift is distorting distance, then size, energy and distribution will all be systematically out of proportion as well. We covered one instance of energy distortion in the Aug 20, 2004 TPOD, "How Big is a Gamma Ray Burst?" Arp showed that high and low redshift objects are clustered together in family groupings, so the errors introduced to the distance calculations should be proportionally larger as the redshift becomes higher. So the distortions should be greatest at the highest redshifts. In ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 570  -  29 Nov 2006  -  8k  -  URL: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2005/arch05/050214bigbang.html
66. Galaxies Behaving Badly [Thunderbolts Website]
... The technology is extraordinary, but the investigators' theoretical assumptions can only invite more contradictions and unanswered questions. The astronomers say that GIRAFFE enables them to determine the velocities of small areas within distant galaxies. But this claim is based on the most shaky assumption of the Big Bang theory — that the redshift of a galaxy provides a reliable measure of velocity and, therefore, of distance. It is assumed that 'high-redshift galaxies' means 'distant galaxies'. Of course, the farther away a galaxy is, the longer time its light ... travel to reach us. Therefore, distant galaxies should show us what the universe looked like long ago. The illustration above gives results obtained with GIRAFFE on 'distant' galaxies. (See larger illustration here). The first column shows images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. The second column is the "velocity field" deduced from GIRAFFE observations: the reddish parts "show material moving away from us with respect to the mean velocity of the galaxy, while the blue parts are moving towards us". The scale in kilometers ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 570  -  29 Nov 2006  -  15k  -  URL: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2006/arch06/060426badgalaxies.html
67. Biology's Big Bang [Science Frontiers Website]
... Science Frontiers ONLINE No. 85: Jan-Feb 1993 Issue Contents Other pages Home Page Science Frontiers Online All Issues This Issue Sourcebook Project Sourcebook Subjects Biology's big bang Representatives of three body plans (phyla): jellyfish (coelenterata); aphid (arthropoda); eohippis (chordata); The title refers to the so-called "Cambrian explosion," that period that began some 570 million years ago, during which all known animal phyla that readily fossilize seem to have originated. The biological phyla are defined by characteristic body plans. Humans ... for example, are among the Chordata. Some other phyla are the Arthropoda (insects, crustaceans), the Mollusca (clams, squids), the Nemotada (roundworms), etc. All of these phyla trace their ancestries back to that biologically innovative period termed the Cambrian explosion. Even at the taxonomic level just below the phylum, the class (i.e., the vertebrates), most biological invention seems to stem from the Cambrian. J.S. Levinton, in a long article in the November 1992 Scientific American, explores ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 570  -  29 Apr 2005  -  5k  -  URL: http://www.science-frontiers.com/sf085/sf085b05.htm
... the essay“ What is Actually the Case ”) Analysis of the light from the four outside bright spots shows a high redshift (designated by “z”) of 1.73. The light from the inner bright spot shows a z of only 0.31. In the Big Bang theory, z is a measure of distance, so the four outside bright spots must be far away (astronomically speaking) and the inside bright spot must be nearby. The alignment is coincidental. However, such a close configuration of four objects at the ... reaches of the universe incidentally lining up around a nearby object is not likely. Another theory supplies another possibility: In General Relativity, light passing near a massive object will be bent, much as light is bent as it passes through a lens. The effect has even been named “gravitational lensing”. If the nearby object were massive enough and a far object were aligned directly behind the nearby object along our line of sight, the gravity of the nearby object could bend the light of the far object into four virtual images ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 570  -  29 Nov 2006  -  14k  -  URL: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2006/arch06/060725galaxylens1.html
69. Missing Quasars of M82 [Thunderbolts Website]
... on the sky), but beyond the photo-frame of the close-up images lies a group of QSO's [quasars as unusual as the galaxy itself (see star map on left.) But because the principle that redshift equals distance is one of the basic foundations of the big bang theory, these quasars appear to lie at various distances, all far beyond M82. Margaret and Geoffrey Burbidge, Halton Arp and Stefano Zibetti disagree. In their 2003 paper, _QSO's associated with Messier 82_, they point out many reasons why this this ... of quasars must be associated with M82, in spite of their incompatible redshifts. The quasar group is too dense to be accidental. The average distribution of quasars in any direction is about 10 per square degree. In M82's immediate vicinity, there are already more than 60 quasars per square degree. There may be more yet: several addition quasar candidates are identified but not yet confirmed. Some of these lie within the body of M82. The distribution of quasars within this group is not random. Nine quasars form a tight cone ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 570  -  29 Nov 2006  -  9k  -  URL: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2004/arch/040802quasars-m82.html
70. Einstein's Biggest Blunder [SIS Internet Digest $]
... large telescopes, Dr Edwin Hubble's observations showed that the Universe is indeed expanding. This convinced Einstein that if we looked back in time, the Universe would have been so small and so dense that it would have had an identifiable beginning- a cosmic explosion called the Big Bang. The constant expansion would counterbalance gravitational forces, keeping the Universe stable and doing away with the need for lambda, the cosmological constant. Einstein now called this his 'biggest blunder'. However there were still a number of aspects of the Universe that were ... that could not be explained by Einstein's theory. Andy Albrecht and Joao Magueijo's hypothesis that the speed of light has changed over the 15-billion-year evolution of the Universe could explain its stability over that long period. It also suggests, though, that the Big Bang could happen again- indeed that the birth of our Universe was just one Big Bang in an endless, eternal cycle. Dr Joćo Magueijo is with Imperial College, London, Web: http://euclid.tp.ph.ic.ac.uk/~magueijo/ Prof Andreas Albrecht is at Univ. of ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 570  -  05 Mar 2003  -  4k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/i-digest/2000-2/15einst.htm
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