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Search results for: persian in all categories

382 results found.

39 pages of results.
11. Forum [SIS C&C Workshop $]
... down the right edge of the slab, seems to indicate that the completion of the slab took place in the reign of a king Shoshenq. The style of writing of the king's name is late in date and resembles that of either Shoshenq V or VI. The suggestion, therefore, is that Ankh-ef-en-Sekhmet was a contemporary or close predecessor of one of these two kings, who reigned between circa 675 and 620 in the revised scheme and around 735 in the conventional chronology. After Ankh-ef-en-Sekhmet the line of HPM's seems to cease until the Persian epoch with no records found of any individual holding this office. The Egyptologist L.Borchardt, in an attempt to fill this gap, uncovered a short genealogy of HPMs from the Persian era (dated to 489 BC), counting back four generations to a HPM Ankh-ef-en-Sekhmet with the same titles as our HPM of the Berlin genealogy. Clearly, in a time span of 246 years (conventional dates), it would be wholly unreasonable to hypothesise only four incumbents whose period of office would average out at 60 years each! Unfortunately therefore ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 75  -  05 Mar 2003  -  17k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/workshop/vol0601/18forum.htm
... "The Problem of the Greek Letters" With regard to the problematic letters, found on the tiles of the palace of Ramses III, Velikovsky also quotes the conclusions of Mahmud Hamza, an Arab Egyptologist of the early twentieth century (Peoples, P. 9). Hamza definitely ruled out the idea of a Ptolemaic restoration and supported the Ramesside authenticity of the tiles. His attempt, however, to interpret the letters as hieratic signs proved abortive and unwarranted. "The Rosettes" For the Egyptologists, the presence of a distinctly Persian rosette motif on the obverse side of the Ramesside tiles added yet another dimension to the problem (Peoples, pp. 11-12 and plate 2). As Velikovsky points out, this "adds a 'Persian problem' to the 'Greek problem' if the tiles were manufactured more than six hundred years before Cambyses subjugated Egypt." A rosette design, totally analogous to those found on the tiles of Ramses III, appears as early as the ninth century B.C. in Persian art. It can be seen as the dominant element of ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 68  -  05 Mar 2003  -  30k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0204/077peopl.htm
... , this holds true for Egypt itself. The Greek Letters With regard to the problematic letters, found on the tiles of the palace of Ramses III, Velikovsky also quotes the conclusions of Mahmud Hamza, an Arab Egyptologist of the early twentieth century (Peoples, p.9). Hamza definitely ruled out the idea of a Ptolemaic restoration and supported the Ramesside authenticity of the tiles. His attempt, however, to interpret the letters as hieratic signs proved abortive and unwarranted. 'The Rosettes' For the Egyptologists, the presence of a distinctly Persian rosette motif on the obverse side of the Ramesside tiles added yet another dimension to the problem (Peoples, pp.11- 12 and plate 2). As Velikovsky points out, this "adds a 'Persian problem' to the 'Greek problem' if the tiles were manufactured more than six hundred years before Cambyses subjugated Egypt". A rosette design, totally analogous to those found on the tiles of Ramses III, appears as early as the ninth century BC in Persian art. It can be seen as the dominant element of a ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 68  -  05 Mar 2003  -  31k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v0201/20sea.htm
... : Media (later Persia, now Iran) and India. Whatever the exact nature of the original beliefs of the Aryan race, their cosmogonical faith followed different routes and processes of evolution in the various regions within which they settled. The religious concepts of the indigenous populations, which they either conquered or assimilated, in turn infiltrated their original dogmas. Today there is little extant that can be considered common to the mythologies of the Indo-Aryans, the ancient Medes, and later Persians. Judging by Vedic (Indian) and Avestan (Persian) literature, the Aryans seem to have brought the worship of Indra, Mit(h)ra, Agni, and Soma with them. In the kingdom of the Mitanni, the gods Mit(h)ra, Varuna, Indra, and the Nasatyas were mentioned in an extant treaty. If there were other deities common to these three nations, the mists of time and the later teachings of Zarathustra seem to have buried them. But even when it comes to these few common divinities, Persian mythology has really close ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 64  -  05 Mar 2003  -  45k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0804/001child.htm
15. Forum [SIS C&C Review $]
... the real nature of the pre-Exile god was eradicated. The cult centre of Shiloh was downgraded (it was still in existence in the late monarchy, mentioned by Jeremiah) and Jerusalem was upgraded [6. The old religion became associated with abominable cult practices, high altars, stone circles, and human sacrifice. The opposition was demonised and history was rewritten- as happened after the introdction of Christianity in Europe and Islam in Asia. It seems that an intellectual shift occurred during the Exile, possibly as a result of influence from Persian Zoroastrianism [5. Thompson takes this to the extreme [7 but it is clear that the Exile marked a watershed in the development of Judaism. Jerusalem became the focus and site of the temple. History was rewritten to provide Jerusalem with a role in the original state of Israel, a 'united kingdom' in order to encompass all the remnant people of both Judah and the northern kingdom. The Deut. author appears to have had a similar attitude and was keen to uproot ancient altars and high places etc. However when ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 60  -  05 Mar 2003  -  18k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v1996n1/37forum.htm
... Manetho by Eusebius and Africanus were all grossly mistaken in their compilations of chronological sequences of dynasties. The king lists found on stone and papyrus in Egypt should not be read as a chronological sequence of sole rulers of all Egypt. These factors in turn misled subsequent scholars into adopting the very long conventional chronology. (d) A belief that Heinsohn is correct in his early claims that (i) Sargon of Akkad ruled at the time of Sargon II and (ii) that the late Neo Assyrians and Babylonians are alter-egos of the Persian rulers. Thus Sargon II is an alter-ego of Darius I (The Great). B. The Revision Herodotus as we know quotes Egyptian early history largely as it was told him by Egyptian priests. He was in no position to query what he was told, nor to ask what happened to the Assyrian invaders and their appointees. The selective information offered to a foreigner by the Egyptian priests, drawn from what was left of their records after the ravages of foreign conquests, is hardly likely to be a reliable platform upon ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 60  -  05 Mar 2003  -  17k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v2001n1/59age.htm
17. Who Were the Neo-Assyrian Kings? [SIS C&C Workshop $]
... them all between 700 and 330 BC. The parallels given in the chart are valid, but are they enough? Identifying a series of great names from ancient history with another requires more than a few or even several coincidences of story and events, however compelling these may be. To identify one king with another, every piece of information which applies to one must, by definition, apply to the other, or else it must be clearly shown to apply to neither. Whatever the merits or demerits of lining up Assyrian and Persian rulers, the ones chosen make a chronological jump which seems to me to have serious consequences for the historical links with Israel, Judah and other neighbouring and even further off states. Perhaps Sweeney has considered these, in which case he will be able to answer the following questions: (a) which Assyrian/Persian ruler defeated Israel and when? (b) who sacked the temple in Jerusalem and when? (c) which Assyrian/Persian ruler permitted the Jews to return to Judah and when? (d) ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 60  -  05 Mar 2003  -  5k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/workshop/w1993no1/28neo.htm
... really largely the same as the rulers of the XXth Dynasty. In Ramses II (and the forthcoming Assyrian Conquest) he claims that the kings of the XXVIth Dynasty have also been duplicated, appearing in the histories of Egypt under their native names (in the XIXth Dynasty) and again (in the XXVIth) under different names known to us from Greek and Hebrew sources. The rulers usually identified as those of the XXVIth and the XXXth Dynasties he regards as "squatters", minor kings or governors that really belong to the Persian period. However, a glance at the table below will show that in both cases the evidence for the conventional identifications is not to be dismissed lightly. For both dynasties there is a complete accord with regard to names, and almost perfect agreement for reign-lengths, between the information of the Greek, Biblical and Assyrian sources and the data available from the native records. This should be compared with the identifications proposed by Velikovsky, where none of the reign-lengths given agree, and where the few attempts to explain the name of the ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 60  -  05 Mar 2003  -  55k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v0302/48time.htm
... ). Naveh wrote the preface to this volume and points out on p. 12 that this group of bullae have all appeared since 1968, all without provenance, and all with certain peculiarities of script. Included in this group is the well known seal impression of 'Berekyahu son of Neriyahu, the scribe' (No. 417 in the Corpus), i.e. Jeremiah's scribe Baruch son of Neriah (Jer 36:4). If this really is a forgery it removes one obstacle to down-dating most of these seals into the Persian period. A well known inscription from Egypt, which refers to Israel, is Shoshenq's Karnak Temple victory scene wherein he lists captured places in Israel. Prof. Kitchen has recently proposed that Nos. 105-106 in the list probably read 'The Heights of David' (reported in BAR Jan/Feb 1999, pp. 34-5). This would be the third likely mention of David in ancient inscriptions, the others being the Dan stela and the Mesha stela. Another Lower Than Low Chronology For Mesopotamia There has long been a debate ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 60  -  05 Mar 2003  -  12k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v1998n2/36east.htm
20. Untitled [Catastrophism & Ancient History Journal $]
... time of the Assyrian conquest of the northern kingdom. To maintain his "semi-conventional" position on the stratigraphy, Cardona must dismiss this coincidence of the stratigraphical record with the Hebrew literary one as a coincidence. But applying these same fastidious standards to his own interpretation of the literary sources about Saturn, why should we give them any more credence? Occam's Razor cuts both ways. (3) THE CITY OF CLAY TABLET'S The broad consensus of Biblical scholarship maintains that the Hebrew Bible was extensively edited into its final form in the early Persian period. Some scholars such as Richard Friedman of Harvard believe the Redactor, as the chief editor was called, was Ezra the Scribe. The interpolation of place names common in the latter period into the earlier text, complete with occasional clarifying geographical notes, was a common practice on the Redactor's part. One such reference appears to have been the reference to "Ur of the Chaldees" in Genesis 11:31. Even Pithom and Ramses in Exodus 1:11 may be later names interpolated to identify earlier sites. Applying ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 60  -  05 Mar 2003  -  64k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/cat-anc/vol1402/138resp.htm
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