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Search results for: dinosaur? in all categories

308 results found.

31 pages of results.
... From: Kronos Vol. II No. 2 (Nov 1976) Home¦ Issue Contents Were All Dinosaurs Reptiles? Immanuel Velikovsky Copyright 1976 by Immanuel Velikovsky (In the archives of Immanuel Velikovsky, two articles on the present subject were found by his assistant, Jan Sammer. One version dates from January 1941 and the other from early 1951. It was the task of the Editor-in-Chief of KRONOS to consolidate the two articles in order to avoid any redundancy. To that end, Velikovsky empowered the Editor-in-Chief of KRONOS to unite the ... 1966) p. 100. Theories of extinction range to include plant alkaloid poisoning, cosmic radiation, drastic global climatic change, cometary collision, asphyxiation, stress, old age, and constipation.- The Ed.6. R. S. Lull, "Dinosaura," Encyclopedia Americana 7. [See J. H. Ostrom, "Terrestrial vertebrates as indicators of Mesozoic climates," Proc. North Amer. Paleontol. Conv. (1969), pp. 347-376-- "The evidence indicates that erect posture ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 310  -  05 Mar 2003  -  26k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0202/091dinos.htm
... From: Kronos Vol. II No. 3 (Feb 1977) Home¦ Issue Contents Typology, Phylogeny, and Viviparity: A Note on the Taxonomy of Dinosaurs Immanuel Velikovsky's article "Were All Dinosaurs Reptiles?"(1) (published in 1976 but basically written in 1941) is an exciting anticipation of the work of Robert Bakker(2) and Adrian Desmond,(3) suggesting that some if not all of the dinosaurs were warm-blooded. The prescient persuasiveness of Velikovsky's argument is marred, however, by several descriptive and classificatory errors in the initial section subtitled "Brontosaurus Was a Mammal." The first of these is his statement, on p. 92, paragraph 2, "Reptiles... do not bear their living young" (which I read as "do not bear living young"). While this statement is true with regard to turtles and crocodilians, it is at best half true with regard to snakes and lizards, among whom there are numerous viviparous or ovoviviparous species.(4) Among aquatic and subarctic ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 150  -  05 Mar 2003  -  5k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0203/084typol.htm
3. The Dinosaurs Of Winter And The Polar Forests [Science Frontiers Website]
... Science Frontiers ONLINE No. 75: May-Jun 1991 Issue Contents Other pages Home Page Science Frontiers Online All Issues This Issue Sourcebook Project Sourcebook Subjects The Dinosaurs Of Winter And The Polar Forests It seems appropriate after suggesting above that the dinosaurs might have been frozen to death in a cosmic winter to remind the reader that some of the dinosaurs were pretty tough animals. Many dinosaur fossils have been dug up in Alaska, northern Canada, Siberia, New Zealand, and Antarctica. Not only were some dinosaurs cold-resistant but, seeing many were herbivorous, they were also able to migrate to more temperate climes as the long days of the polar summers waned. The point here is that the dinosaurs as a clan were very adaptable and should have survived severe environmental stress. (Vickers-Rich Patricia, and Rich, Thomas H.; "The Dinosaurs of Winter," Natural History, 100:33, April 1991.) That the polar regions were once covered by lush forests has been underscored by recent discoveries in both polar regions. Stumps of huge trees 45 million years ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 150  -  29 Apr 2005  -  5k  -  URL: http://www.science-frontiers.com/sf075/sf075g10.htm
... From: Kronos Vol. III No. 1 (Fall 1977) Home¦ Issue Contents The Dawnseekers: the First History of American Paleontology by Robert West Howard (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, New York, 1975. xiii, 314 pp., $8.95) The Hot-blooded Dinosaurs: A Revolution in Paleontology by Adrian J. Desmond (The Dial Press/James Wade, New York, 1976. 238 pp., $12.95) Reviewed by H. JAMES BIRX Associate Professor of Anthropology Canisius College, Buffalo, New York Science is supposed to be an accumulative, self-correcting, open-ended approach to understanding the natural world in all its complexity and changeability. Human inquiry continues to alter our view of man, life, and planetary history. There is always a need to rethink old ideas rigorously, consider the implications of new facts, and modify established conceptual frameworks. In the last century, this was demonstrated in the academic and social approach to the theory of evolution in general, and the validity of the geological and paleontological records in particular. In this ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 144  -  05 Mar 2003  -  21k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0301/076dawn.htm
5. Impossible Dinosaurs [Thunderbolts Website]
... home updates news and views picture of the day resources team a role for you contact us Credit: from a program produced by Office KEI and shown nationwide in Japan on February 22, 2004. home pic of the day archive subject index abstract archive Links: Holoscience Electric Cosmos The Universe Plasma Cosmology Society for Interdisciplinary Studies educational resources Aeon Journal Jun 23, 2005 Impossible Dinosaurs The giant dinosaurs are fascinating. How did they get so big? Why are there none alive today? Their size rivals that of modern whales, which cannot survive without the buoyancy of water. So early paleontologists postulated that the biggest dinosaurs must have spent most of their lives wading in the shallow seas of the Mesozoic Era. Then dinosaur footprints were discovered. Not just a few, but thousands of footprints. Somehow, even the largest of dinosaurs were walking around on land, not even dragging their enormous tails behind them. So wading in shallow seas was replaced by grazing in herds and the original reason for the wading-- that a dinosaur on land would have been a ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 135  -  29 Nov 2006  -  9k  -  URL: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2005/arch05/050623impossible-dinosaur.html
6. Do We Really Understand The Dinosaurs? [Science Frontiers Website]
... Science Frontiers ONLINE No. 55: Jan-Feb 1988 Issue Contents Other pages Home Page Science Frontiers Online All Issues This Issue Sourcebook Project Sourcebook Subjects Do we really understand the dinosaurs? Until very recently, the standard dinosaur scene in the books and magazines showed huge, ungainly beasts shuffling around in lush swamps. Things are changing. Dinosaurs are now becoming more lively and talented; they may even have been warm-blooded! A recent paleontological expedition to the Gobi Desert by some Canadians will change the dinosaur stereotype even more. The Gobi dinosaur-bone sites are incredibly rich-- comparable with those in Alberta. What is most impressive, however, is the environment the Gobi dinosaurs lived in. "The dinosaurs of China and Mongolia did not live in the same type of lush, well-watered environment that existed in North America during the Mesozoic era, when dinosaurs dominated the globe. The dinosaurs of Alberta flourished on a great swampy coastal plain on the edge of a vast inland sea. In ancient China, conditions were much harsher. A modern-day equivalent would be the Great Salt ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 135  -  29 Apr 2005  -  5k  -  URL: http://www.science-frontiers.com/sf055/sf055p12.htm
7. Impossible Dinosaurs [Thunderbolts Website]
... home updates news and views picture of the day resources team a role for you contact us Credit: from a program produced by Office KEI and shown nationwide in Japan on February 22, 2004. home pic of the day archive subject index abstract archive Links: Holoscience Electric Cosmos The Universe Plasma Cosmology Society for Interdisciplinary Studies educational resources Aeon Journal Nov 24, 2004 Impossible Dinosaurs The giant dinosaurs are fascinating. How did they get so big? Why are there none alive today? Their size rivals that of modern whales, which cannot survive without the buoyancy of water. So early paleontologists postulated that the biggest dinosaurs must have spent most of their lives wading in the shallow seas of the Mesozoic Era. Then dinosaur footprints were discovered. Not just a few, but thousands of footprints. Somehow, even the largest of dinosaurs were walking around on land, not even dragging their enormous tails behind them. So wading in shallow seas was replaced by grazing in herds and the original reason for the wading-- that a dinosaur on land would have been a ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 135  -  29 Nov 2006  -  9k  -  URL: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2004/arch/041124impossible-dinosaur.html
... plantlife thrived almost uncontrollably, evidently laying down the thick coal seams and oil pools which we mine and exploit today. [3 This unruly and rampant growth in the warm greenhouse of the Mississipian and Pennsylvanian Epochs during the Carboniferous bespeaks massive amounts of carbon dioxide in Earth's early atmosphere to permit such frenzied photosynthesis. We shall, however, concern ourselves primarily with the Mesozoic Era, that itself is divided into the Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous (" chalk-like") Periods, an era which was singularly and uniquely the Age of Dinosaurs. Here, too, substantive coal beds were laid down by rampant vegetation and the calcium carbonate skeletons of microscopic foraminifera built up massive chalk and limestone formations that also indicated elevated levels of available carbon dioxide to stimulate plant growth, as well as the development of shell-like outer coverings of invertebrate lifeforms such as the early molluscs. The subsequent Cenozoic Era was the Age of Mammals, in spite of traces of mammalian existence as far back as the Late Permian or Early Triassic; and, whatwith the extinction of the dinosaurs at the ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 132  -  05 Mar 2003  -  54k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0502/21ptero.htm
9. The Night Of The Polar Dinosaur [Science Frontiers Website]
... Science Frontiers ONLINE No. 42: Nov-Dec 1985 Issue Contents Other pages Home Page Science Frontiers Online All Issues This Issue Sourcebook Project Sourcebook Subjects The Night Of The Polar Dinosaur Somewhere west of Deadhorse, a small town on Prudhoe Bay in northern Alaska, paleontologists have found the bones of at least three species of dinosaurs. But wait, the latitude there is 70 north today and according to magnetic measurements of the rocks, it was about the same when the dinosaurs met their demise. At these high latitudes the dinosaurs either had to contend with two months of darkness each year or they had to migrate many hundreds of miles over the rough Alaskan landscape. The visions of dinosaurs groping for tons of vegetable food in the polar night is about as incongruous as imagining them trekking down to the Lower 481 Scientists are now maintaining that these dinosaurs did prosper on the shore of the Arctic Ocean, even in the dark, because the climate then was semitropical or temperate. This was because the earth's climate was more equable or uniform. They are, however, surprised ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 120  -  29 Apr 2005  -  5k  -  URL: http://www.science-frontiers.com/sf042/sf042p19.htm
... June 1978) Home¦ Issue Contents Some Additional References on Mass Extinctions and on Radioactivity (especially K-T) Johan B.Kloosterman Selected by Johan B.Kloosterman from several bibliographies, using as criterion only the titles. With thanks to Dale A.Russell, Llewellyn I.Price, Jacobus C.Gravesteyn and Manfred Warth. See also the previous sections, and the articles of Schindewolf and of Salop in Catastr.Geol. 212. Andova A., 1929: Aussterben der Mesozoischen Reptilian. Palaeobiologice 2:222-245; 2:365-401. Anonymous, 1975: Did the anaerobes defeat the dinosaurs? New Sci. 68/977:512. Axelrod D. 1., 1967: Quaternary extinctions of large mammals. U. of CA, Pub/. in Geo/. Sci. 47:1-42. Axelrod D. I., Bailey H. P., 1968: Cretaceous Dinosaur extinction. Evolution 22/3:595-611. Bakker R. T., 1977: Tetrapod mass extinctions. In: Hallam A. (ad.): Patterns of Evolution. Elsevier. p. 439-468. ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 120  -  05 Mar 2003  -  14k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/catgeo/cg78jun/12mass.htm
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