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Search results for: big bang in all categories

340 results found containing all search terms.

34 pages of results.
1. The “Science” of the Big Bang [Thunderbolts Website]
... indicates warmer, and blue indicates cooler areas. The cosmic microwave background fluctuations are extremely faint (one part in 100,00) compared to the 2.73 Kelvin average temperature of the radiation field. Credit: NASA Aug 23, 2006 The “Science” of the Big Bang Astronomer Halton Arp has called it“ science by news release ,” and some of the most disturbing examples come from statements “confirming” the validity of the Big Bang. Many critics of modern theories in the sciences have noticed that science editors (newspaper ... magazine, and television) appear to have lost the ability to separate fact from theory. When discussing the trademarks of popular cosmology, such as the Big Bang, the science media incessantly report that new discoveries confirm them — even when such reports are far from the truth. One reason for this pattern is simply the momentum of archaic beliefs. But it is also apparent that good news is essential to the funding of exotic projects. At the heart of conventional cosmology lies the dogma of an electrically neutral universe governed by gravity alone ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 960  -  29 Nov 2006  -  17k  -  URL: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2006/arch06/060823bigbangscience.html
2. Was there really a big bang? [Science Frontiers Website]
... Science Frontiers ONLINE No. 17: Fall 1981 Issue Contents Other pages Home Page Science Frontiers Online All Issues This Issue Sourcebook Project Sourcebook Subjects Was there really a big bang? Narlikar says, "Maybe not," and proceeds to tick off observational evidence against it. He begins, however, by pointing out the philosophical impasse encountered as Big Bang proponents look backward to time= 0 and earlier. Where did the matter/energy of the Big Bang come from? Was the venerable Law of Conservation of Mass/Energy ... ? Big Bangers loftily dismiss such questions as "nonsense." Narlikar follows with some observational problems of the Big Bang: There seem to be objects in the universe that are older than the Big Bang age of the universe (9-13 billion years); Quasar redshifts used to support the Big Bang theory may arise from the general expansion of the universe; The microwave background radiation of 3 K, which was gleefully embraced by Big Bangers as an echo of their version of creation, is actually of the same energy density as starlight ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 900  -  29 Apr 2005  -  5k  -  URL: http://www.science-frontiers.com/sf017/sf017p04.htm
3. The Picture that Won’t Go Away [Thunderbolts Website]
... NGC 7319, taken by the Hubble Telescope. Seen in front of the dense galactic core was a quasar. Prevailing ideology did not permit a quasar to occupy that position, and its presence threatened to shatter one of the most cherished themes of mainstream astronomy: the Big Bang. For those who wonder what all the commotion was about, we offer this brief refresher. The rationale for the Big Bang rests substantially on an interpretation of a well-known phenomenon called “redshift”. The term refers to the shift of light from distant ... toward red on the light spectrum. Many years ago, astronomers decided that redshifted objects must be moving away from the observer, stretching out their lightwaves. This “Doppler interpretation” of redshift enabled astronomers, based on the degree of redshift, to calculate both the distances and velocities of the objects. From these calculations, certain conclusions were inescapable. If all redshifted objects are moving farther away, the universe must be expanding. If the universe is expanding, the expansion must have had a starting point — an unimaginable explosion producing ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 825  -  29 Nov 2006  -  16k  -  URL: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2005/arch05/050610arptest.html
4. The Picture that Won’t Go Away [Thunderbolts Website]
... NGC 7319, taken by the Hubble Telescope. Seen in front of the dense galactic core was a quasar. Prevailing ideology did not permit a quasar to occupy that position, and its presence threatened to shatter one of the most cherished themes of mainstream astronomy: the Big Bang. For those who wonder what all the commotion was about, we offer this brief refresher. The rationale for the Big Bang rests substantially on an interpretation of a well-known phenomenon called “redshift”. The term refers to the shift of light from distant ... toward red on the light spectrum. Many years ago, astronomers decided that redshifted objects must be moving away from the observer, stretching out their lightwaves. This “Doppler interpretation” of redshift enabled astronomers, based on the degree of redshift, to calculate both the distances and velocities of the objects. From these calculations, certain conclusions were inescapable. If all redshifted objects are moving farther away, the universe must be expanding. If the universe is expanding, the expansion must have had a starting point — an unimaginable explosion producing ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 825  -  29 Nov 2006  -  16k  -  URL: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2006/arch06/060103arptest.html
5. Big Bang a Big Loser in 2005 [Thunderbolts Website]
... day resources team a role for you contact us Credit: HDF Team/NASA home pic of the day archive subject index abstract archive Links: Holoscience Electric Cosmos The Universe Plasma Cosmology Society for Interdisciplinary Studies educational resources Aeon Journal Dec 27, 2004 Prediction #1: Big Bang a Big Loser in 2005 You ’ d never know it from official news releases, but the Big Bang is broken and can ’ t be fixed. A concession speech may be unlikely in 2005, but the progressive decline of one of the twentieth century ... s most popular theories now seems inescapable. The Big Bang has lost its theoretical foundation, which was the Doppler interpretation of redshift (linking redshift to the stretching of light wavelengths as objects move away from us). It is now known that, while almost all observed galaxies are redshifted, the Doppler interpretation of this shift does not provide a reliable measure of velocity or (indirectly) of distance. Quasars and galaxies of different redshift stand in physical proximity to each other and are observed to be connected by filaments of matter. ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 810  -  29 Nov 2006  -  13k  -  URL: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2004/arch/041227prediction-bigbang.html
6. Down With The Big Bang [Science Frontiers Website]
... Science Frontiers ONLINE No. 66: Nov-Dec 1989 Issue Contents Other pages Home Page Science Frontiers Online All Issues This Issue Sourcebook Project Sourcebook Subjects Down With The Big Bang We might have concocted the above title, but we didn't! Rather, J. Maddox, the Editor of Nature, raised that red flag. To make things even worse, he subtitled his editorial: "Apart from being philosophically unacceptable, the Big Bang is an oversimple view of how the Universe began, and it is unlikely to survive the decade ahead ... " His philosophical objcections to the Big Bang are powerful: "For one thing, the implication is that there was an instant at which time literally began and, so, by extension, an instant before which there was no time. That in turn implies that even if the origin of the Universe may be successfully supposed to lie in the Big Bang, the origin of the Big Bang itself is not susceptible to discussion." The Big Bang, Maddox says, is no more scientific than Biblical creation! The scientific objections ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 780  -  29 Apr 2005  -  5k  -  URL: http://www.science-frontiers.com/sf066/sf066a04.htm
7. Quasar in Front of a Galaxy [Thunderbolts Website]
... is a must read since it is both educational and hard-hitting while being readable and entertaining. Writing eye-opening material in more than one arena, Arp takes on the corruption of good science in academia, government and publishing after giving us great material concerning red shift, the Big Bang, and cosmology. The book Seeing Red can be ordered via the link. Order Link Oct 01, 2004 Quasar in Front of Galaxy October 3, 2003: the big bang was proved wrong. Again. And here is the proof (image above ... . The galaxy, NGC 7319, is a Seyfert 2, which means it is a galaxy shrouded with such heavy dust clouds that they obscure most of the bright, active nucleus that defines a normal Seyfert galaxy. This galaxy has a redshift of 0.0225. The tiny white spot is a quasar either silhouetted in front of the opaque gas clouds or embedded in the topmost layers of the dust. The redshift of the quasar is 2.114. Why does this prove the big bang wrong? One of the two major foundations of the ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 765  -  29 Nov 2006  -  12k  -  URL: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2004/arch/041001quasar-galaxy.html
8. So Far and yet so Near [Thunderbolts Website]
... for you contact us Credit: ESA XMM-Newton home pic of the day archive subject index abstract archive Links: Holoscience Electric Cosmos The Universe Plasma Cosmology Society for Interdisciplinary Studies educational resources Aeon Journal Apr 01, 2005 So Far and Yet So Near One more problem for the Big Bang: Recently-discovered galaxy clusters reveal too much complex structure to be as “young” as Big Bang speculations would require. The small inset in the photo above shows a recently discovered cluster of galaxies that poses a big problem for the Big Bang. According to ... theory, which determines the distance of a galaxy by its redshift, the cluster is 9 billion light years away. That means the light we see today was emitted 9 billion years ago, or only 5 billion years after the Big Bang, in which all matter and energy supposedly was created. Gravitational forces could not have generated such a cluster of galaxies in such an astronomically short time. The ESO news release commented: "The discovery of such a complex and mature structure so early in the history of the Universe is highly ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 765  -  29 Nov 2006  -  10k  -  URL: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2005/arch05/050401sofar.html
9. So Far and Yet So Near [Thunderbolts Website]
... home updates news and views picture of the day resources team a role for you contact us picture of the day archive subject index subject abstracts Credit: ESA XMM-Newton Oct 20, 2006 So Far and Yet So Near One more problem for the Big Bang: Recently-discovered galaxy clusters reveal too much complex structure to be as “young” as Big Bang speculations would require. The small inset in the photo above shows a recently discovered cluster of galaxies that poses a big problem for the Big Bang. According to conventional theory, which ... the distance of a galaxy by its redshift, the cluster is 9 billion light years away. That means the light we see today was emitted 9 billion years ago, or only 5 billion years after the Big Bang, in which all matter and energy supposedly was created. Gravitational forces could not have generated such a cluster of galaxies in such an astronomically short time. The ESO news release commented: "The discovery of such a complex and mature structure so early in the history of the Universe is highly surprising. Indeed, ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 765  -  29 Nov 2006  -  13k  -  URL: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2006/arch06/061020sofasonear.html
10. The Big Bang As An Illusion [Science Frontiers Website]
... Science Frontiers ONLINE No. 34: Jul-Aug 1984 Issue Contents Other pages Home Page Science Frontiers Online All Issues This Issue Sourcebook Project Sourcebook Subjects The Big Bang As An Illusion That the universe began with the Big Bang is now so ingrained in our thinking that we almost never search for plausible alternatives. Perhaps the Big Bang is just a facade that diverts us from theories that better explain the observed characteristics of the universe. A trio of American and British astron omers (B.J. Carr, J.R. Bond, W.D. Arnett ... are exploring the possibility that the cosmos began with a generation of very massive stars rather than the debris of the Big Bang. These huge stars would have had masses 100 or so times that of the sun. By virtue of the much higher pressures and temperatures at their cores, they would have burnt up their fuel inventories much faster than sun-sized stars. Thus they would have burnt themselves out long ago, probably surviving as black holes. Such an ancient generation of massive stars can explain four puzzling features of the universe: ( ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 750  -  29 Apr 2005  -  5k  -  URL: http://www.science-frontiers.com/sf034/sf034p07.htm
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