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Search results for: chemi* in all categories

856 results found.

86 pages of results.
81. Our Chemical Brain [Science Frontiers Website]
... Science Frontiers ONLINE No. 85: Jan-Feb 1993 Issue Contents Other pages Home Page Science Frontiers Online All Issues This Issue Sourcebook Project Sourcebook Subjects Our Chemical Brain Is our brain merely a network of neurons pulsing with electrical signals-- like the circuits of a computer? Such is the accepted picture of the brain. Unquestionably the brain does rely in part upon the transmission of electrical signals for some of its operations, but it now appears that there is a complementary mode of communication that relies upon chemistry rather than electricity. While ... fastest way to transmit signals in the brain seems to be along the neurons and across their points of contact, the synapses, other signals may travel-- a bit more slowly-- by what is termed "volume transmission." Volume transmission is like broadcasting radio waves in three dimensions, except that in the brain the radio waves are replaced by the diffusion of chemical signals. L.F. Agnati et al explain: "...our experiments have shown that neurons also release chemical signals into the extracellular space that are not necessarily ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 210  -  29 Apr 2005  -  6k  -  URL: http://www.science-frontiers.com/sf085/sf085b99.htm
82. Chemical Surprises At The K-T Boundary [Science Frontiers Website]
... Science Frontiers ONLINE No. 65: Sep-Oct 1989 Issue Contents Other pages Home Page Science Frontiers Online All Issues This Issue Sourcebook Project Sourcebook Subjects Chemical surprises at the k-t boundary The presence of high iridium concentrations at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary, some 65 million years ago, has led to the widely accepted notion that an extraterrestrial projectile slammed into the earth at that time, wreaking geological and biological havoc. But the K-T boundary is anything but simple chemically and paleontologically. To illustrate, J.L. Bada and M. Zhao ... found unusual amino acids in sediments laid down before and after this geological time marker. "They find that Danish sediments spanning the narrow boundary layer contain two amino acids, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid and isovaline, that are relatively uncommon in biological materials but abundant in the organicrich meteorites. They suggest that the body which collided with Earth 65 million years ago and left the telltale iridium residue may have been organic-rich, perhaps like a C-type asteroid or a comet. Such a possibility has interesting implications for the extinction and related atmospheric effects, and supports ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 210  -  29 Apr 2005  -  6k  -  URL: http://www.science-frontiers.com/sf065/sf065g10.htm
83. Personal Notes [Pensee]
... Professor of Biology Slippery Rock State College Pennsylvania August 26, 1972 Dear Dr. Velikovsky, At the Symposium in Portland a biologist, whose name I cannot recall, questioned some of the precepts of mutation you had described. You had reiterated that heat, radiation and chemical agents may be individually or in concert responsible for mutation of species. Later I chatted with the biologist and described another agent which, up to now, may not have been seriously considered, and which I feel is of primary importance. Undoubtably chemical and radiation ... . This, by statistical relationship, would give a distribution of mutations that may be somewhat gaussian, whereby only those in the main sequence would survive while those at either extreme have been subjected to unregenerable damage. Similarly, organisms which have been exposed to potentially toxic chemicals, or to pathogenic microorganisms, may develop mutagenic strains. We must, however, be cautious in descriptions of mutations in absolute terms. The current definition of a species rests on the principle that it can viably reproduce generation after generation. But it should also ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 195  -  05 Mar 2003  -  10k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/pensee/ivr02/49person.htm
84. In Memoriam: Earl R. Milton [Aeon Journal $]
... attack. Dr. Milton was born on February 26, 1935, in Montreal, Canada, and moved with his family to Alberta where he attended school. His academic degrees included the B.S., M.S. (in Chemistry), and Ph.D. (in Chemical Physics), all from the University of Alberta. He received a National Research Council Post-Doctoral Fellowship to study spectroscopy and was awarded the Chant Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (silver) in 1960 for his work on the spectroscopy of electrical charges through ... his home in Calgary, from a heart attack. Dr. Milton was born on February 26, 1935, in Montreal, Canada, and moved with his family to Alberta where he attended school. His academic degrees included the B.S., M.S. (in Chemistry), and Ph.D. (in Chemical Physics), all from the University of Alberta. He received a National Research Council Post-Doctoral Fellowship to study spectroscopy and was awarded the Chant Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (silver) in 1960 for his ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 195  -  05 Mar 2003  -  3k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0505/111earl.htm
... damaging to the careers of dedicated scientists, as several of this book's targets discovered to their cost. Had this book been written by one of the rabid pseudoskeptics who infest the Internet it would not even merit a response. But Walter Gratzer is professor emeritus of Biophysical Chemistry at King's College London and hence someone you might expect to be careful with facts. The first, and meatiest part, of the book is a familiar homage to Irving Langmuir, the Nobel Laureate who worked in the US General Electric's laboratory and who coined the ... that pseudoskeptics like themselves are often instrumental in ending the research-- not some natural loss of interest. For example, Langmuir himself admits that he wrote to Niels Bohr to 'head off' any further research into Davis and Barnes 'electron capture' and he and other chemists urged publications such as Physical Review to reject further papers by Allison-- a policy that was adopted. Both Langmuir and Gratzer also fail to explain how, if Allison's magneto-optical apparatus was self-delusion, scientists using it were able correctly to identify a series of unknown ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 195  -  10 Mar 2007  -  18k  -  URL: http://www.alternativescience.com/undergrowth.html
86. A Theory of Melancholy [Velikovsky Archive Website]
... hypothetical toxin lachrymaline. Proteins which are found in tears are albumin and glubalin. Their quantities vary. (2) (Arlt, Lerch 0.504, Fredrichs 0.08- 0.1, Roetth 0.25- 0.6). In his experiments Roetth has caused a formation of tears through chemical and mechanical, and also through psychological, stimuli. Charlton (3) distinguishes two groups of tears, those rich in protein (the secretion of which he determines to originate in the simpaticus) and those poor in protein (the secretion of which he determines ... FOR THE UNDERSTANDING OF MELANCHOLY AND ITS TREATMENT (Eine Arbeitstheorie zum Verstšndnis der Melancholie und ihre Behandlung) by Dr Immanuel Velikovsky (Palestine Institute for Psychological Research) If a person is full of sorrow he is discharging from his body through the cracks in his eyelids various chemicals. The peculiarity of this phenomenon is normally not regarded as being strange since the process of crying is known to everybody since earliest childhood.- This secretion brings relief. In the case of melancholy, the sick person does not shed any tears. In fact ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 195  -  31 Aug 2000  -  8k  -  URL: http://www.varchive.org/tpp/melcholy.htm
87. Psychology Anomalies by Subjects [Science Frontiers Website]
... Skin-Writing/Autographism Allergy Tests Eczema Patch Tests and Hypnosis PPT DENTAL HEALTH Caries and the Mind PPW WOUND-HEALING AND BLEEDING Wound Healing Bleeding PPX BODY CHEMISTRY Histamine Release Hemoglobin Response Poison Tolerance PS PSYCHOKINESIS PSB MENTAL CONTROL OF BIOLOGICAL PROCESSES Control over Microorganisms Control over Plants PSC CONTROL OF CHEMICAL AND NUCLEAR PHENOMENA Influencing Light Diffraction Influencing Random-Event Generators Influencing Nuclear and Chemical Reactions Photographic Effects (Thought Pictures) PSE MENTAL CONTROL OF THE ENVIRONMENT Control over Ambient Temperature PSM CONTROL OF MACHINES AND MATERIALS Technojinx Computer Interference Influencing Dice, Cascades, and other (Supposedly) ... Science Frontiers Catalog of Anomalies (Subjects) Strange reports* Bizarre biology* Anomalous archaeology From New Scientist, Nature, Scientific American, etc Archaeology Astronomy Biology Geology Geophysics Mathematics Psychology Physics Catalog of Anomalies (Subjects) Overview Astronomy Biology Chemistry/Physics Geology Geophysics Logic/mathemitics Archeology Psychology Miscellaneous phenomena Other pages Home Page Science Frontiers Online Science Frontiers: The Book Sourcebook Project P PSYCHOLOGY Catalog of Anomalies (Psychology Subjects) Within each of these fields, catalog sections that are already in print are given alphanumerical labels. For example, ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 195  -  03 Dec 2004  -  18k  -  URL: http://www.science-frontiers.com/cat-psyc.htm
88. Letters [Velikovsky Archive Website]
... August 26, 1972 Dear Dr. Velikovsky, At the Symposium in Portland a biologist, whose name I cannot recall, questioned some of the precepts of mutation you had described. You had reiterated that heat, radiation and chemical agents may be individually or in concert responsible for mutation of species. Later I chatted with the biologist and described another agent which, up to now. may not have been seriously considered, and which I feel is of primary importance. Undoubtably chemical and radiation activity could be responsible for the generation ... . This, by statistical relationship, would give a distribution of mutations that may be somewhat gaussian, whereby only those in the main sequence would survive while those at either extreme have been subjected to unregenerable damage. Similarly, organisms which have been exposed to potentially toxic chemicals, or to pathogenic microorganisms, may develop mutagenic strains. We must, however, be cautious in descriptions of mutations in absolute terms. The current definition of a species rests on the principle that it can viably reproduce generation after generation. But it should also ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 195  -  31 Aug 2000  -  7k  -  URL: http://www.varchive.org/cor/various/720826-jueneman.htm
... on the "likely presence of gasoline, kerosene, and tar" on the Saturnian satellite. "One can readily imagine a deep layer of tar covering the surface." We might also take note of the fact that L. P. Gaucher, writing in Chemical Technology [1972, argues that the Earth must have received continual rains of oil early in its history, owing to chemical reactions in the primitive atmosphere. When asked how he would account for variations in the composition of crude oil, Gaucher replied: "The ... question raised by Angino (Pensee, winter, 1973, 47): "Velikovsky and A. T. Wilson have both said that the petroleum came as rain from above. While this is open to discussion, the fact of the matter still is that the chemistry of petroleum found in recent sediments... and that found in ancient sediments are not the same. One would still have to explain the ways in which each of the differences are brought about. It is possible under Velikovsky's thesis that there have been other ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 195  -  05 Mar 2003  -  14k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/pensee/ivr05/22comets.htm
... the dangers into which scientific organisations have fallen by evolving 'a form of snobbism that excludes all but the chosen elite'. In the case of insect perceptions the biochemical elite have reduced the ability of the male moth to find the female to a simple odoriferous detection of chemical pheromones which she produces. Callahan pieces together a far more interesting and believable story. The insect integumet is a complex structure covered in waxes with electrical properties and delicate bristles and hairs. The antennae are even more complex and, to the eye of one experienced ... part we obstinately continue to look at life from our own narrow point of view. Perhaps the worst thing that happened to biology was the advance in biochemistry. This led to reductionism and for a long time life and evolution have been thought of only in terms of chemicals and their functions. Fortunately several freer-minded biologists are scrambling out of that particular pond but this insightful book was a much earlier plea for taking a wider view. In relating the story of Tesla, the forgotten genius of electrical research, he points out the iniquities ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 195  -  05 Mar 2003  -  4k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v2001n1/58gems.htm
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