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Search results for: assyrian in all categories

601 results found.

61 pages of results.
71. Assyrian History: the 'Black Hole' [SIS C&C Review $]
... From: SIS Chronology& Catastrophism Review 1998:1 (Sep 1998) Home¦ Issue Contents Assyrian History: the 'Black Hole' by Eric Aitchison Historical revisions draw their adherents along strange paths. Those who need to stay in touch with the various revisions must also follow these paths but, like Hansel and Gretel, should keep some markings to allow themselves to make their way back to what they believe is sanity. Velikovsky's radical historical revision was and is the impetus for the new and emerging variations. Heinsohn has a revision, Lasken has a revision, Rohl has a revision; whilst Damien Mackey continues to support the basic Velikovsky line (e.g. Hatshepsut is the Queen of Sheba), new contributors such as Dale Murphie offer another slant on Velikovsky's revision by the more radical realignment of the Manetho Dynastic String. Velikovsky never charted his revisions. We were enthralled as his parallelisms were displayed with his wonderful way with words. Such enthusiasm wanes when one begins the tiresome process of charting these identifications across political and historical events in the broad sweep of the ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 75  -  05 Mar 2003  -  15k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v1998n1/25hole.htm
... Mari, Nuzi, and Khorsabad. At Mari on the central Euphrates, among other rich material, a cuneiform tablet was found which established that Hammurabi of Babylonia and King Shamshi-Adad I of Assyria were contemporaries. An oath was sworn by the life of these two kings in the tenth year of Hammurabi, The finds at Mari "proved conclusively that Hammurabi came to the throne in Babylonia after the accession of Shamshi-Adad I in Assyria".(7) Shamshi-Adad I could not have reigned in the twenty-first century since there exist lists of Assyrian kings which enable us to compute regnal dates. Being compilations of later times, it is admitted by modern research that "the figures in king lists are not infrequently erroneous".(8) But in 1932 a fuller and better-preserved list of Assyrian king names was found at Khorsabad, capital of Sargon II. Published ten years later, in 1942, it contains the names of one hundred and seven Assyrian kings with the number of years of their reigns, Shamshi-Adad I, who is the thirty-first on the list, but ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 75  -  05 Mar 2003  -  19k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0801/078hammu.htm
73. The Autumn Meeting [SIS C&C Workshop $]
... never have been used factually, yet some chronologists continue to use it as such. Tony was in full swing with a multitude of further examples when he realised he had already overstepped his allotted time- and he hadn't even started on the second half- so we are promised a run down on the number symbolism used by Manetho and the Egyptians at a later date. Meanwhile, chronologists take a close look at the numbers you have used in your constructions! After lunch Chris Walker of the British Museum passed round copies of lengthy Assyrian and Babylonian King lists. The orthodox chronology for Mesopotamia had been produced from these. The lists themselves had been compiled from cuneiform texts, including economic texts and teaching texts. It was suggested that cuneiform symbols had been developed to handle bureaucracy, with several hundred signs grouped in categories, all of which students had to learn by rote, and that the procedure lasted 3,000 years unchanged. A lynch pin in the development of the lists was Claudius Ptolemy, who worked on astronomical records and lists of kings of the ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 75  -  05 Mar 2003  -  14k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/workshop/w1993no2/04meet.htm
74. Sardanapallus and Arbaces [Catastrophism & Ancient History Journal $]
... From: Catastrophism and Ancient History XIII:2 (July 1991) Home¦ Issue Contents INTERACTION Sardanapallus and Arbaces Robert de Telder The articles of Dr. Arie Dirkzwager, "Sardanapallus and Arbaces" and "Expanding the end of Assyrian History," showed, once more, that the Assyrian Korsabad list is not complete and that names are missing; and therefore the list needs stretching. This interaction piece is an attempt to come up with a revised Assyrian King list. By leaving the 'shortened' Israeli Kinglist of Thiele and returning to the naturally stretched out biblical chronology of the kings of Israel and Judah an approximate 40 years extra are obtained on the chronological table. Martin Sieff and others showed that these 40 extra years are helpful to link the revised Egyptian Dynasties to the Judean one. The Assyrian King list is also stretched with approximately 40 years. King Arbaces/Jareb was added to the list. The link between the Korsabad list (revised) and the Israeli king list was made with the reign of Shalmaneser III and his contemporaries Ahab and Jehu ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 75  -  05 Mar 2003  -  7k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/cat-anc/vol1302/131sard.htm
75. Hammurabi and the Revised Chronology [Velikovsky Archive Website]
... finds of Mari, Nuzi, and Khorsabad. At Mari on the central Euphrates, among other rich material, a cuneiform tablet was found which established that Hammurabi of Babylonia and King Shamshi-Adad I of Assyria were contemporaries. An oath was sworn by the life of these two kings in the tenth year of Hammurabi, The finds at Mari ? proved conclusively that Hammurabi came to the throne in Babylonia after the accession of Shamshi-Adad I in Assyria ?. 8 Shamshi-Adad I could not have reigned in the twenty-first century since there exist lists of Assyrian kings which enable us to compute regnal dates. Being compilations of later times, it is admitted by modern research that ? the figures in king lists are not infrequently erroneous ?. 9 But in 1932 a fuller and better-preserved list of Assyrian king names was found at Khorsabad, capital of Sargon II. Published ten years later, in 1942, it contains the names of one hundred and seven Assyrian kings with the number of years of their reigns. Shamshi-Adad I, who is the thirty-first on the list, but the first ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 75  -  31 Aug 2000  -  18k  -  URL: http://www.varchive.org/ce/hammurabi.html
... From: SIS Chronology and Catastrophism Workshop 1994 No 1 (Jan 1994) Home¦ Issue Contents FORUM Assyrians and Babylonian Chronologies for 8th- 6th Centuries BC C.L. Prasher Carl Olof Jonsson has claimed that the Assyrian and Babylonian chronologies from the 8th to the 6th century BC are both firmly established [1. However an exception to this has been pointed out by B.J. Aaronson in respect of the identity of 'Pul' of 2 Kings 15:19-20 and 1 Chronicles, 5:26 [2. E.R. Thiele identifies Pul with Tiglath-pileser III, on the grounds that the latter Scripture may be read, 'And the God of Israel stirred up the spirit of Pul, king of Assyria, and he carried them away...' [3. Aaronson counters this as follows: 'This translation, completely foreign to the clear meaning of the Hebrew text, has been adopted in several translations of the Bible, based upon the assurance of Assyriologists that the two kings were one and the same. Thiele also points out that the verb following these names ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 72  -  05 Mar 2003  -  23k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/workshop/w1994no1/21assyr.htm
... proposed Absolute Chronology dates show a progressive reduction. Back to about 664AC the two are very similar but then, as a result of the redating of the 'Third Intermediate Period' the gap widens, increasing to 200 years at 977AC, the 8th year of Ramesses III. From then on, due to various minor adjustments, the difference varies between 200 and 250 years, reaching c. 230 years at the beginning of the 18th Dynasty (1345AC) and c. 250 years at the beginning of Ugarit Moyen III in 1500AC. Assyrian and Babylonian dates and those of the Kassite succession are included in Section 3. Corresponding dates for Egyptian Dynasties XVIII-XX are in the Appendix. The XXI and subsequent dynasties are dealt with in Section 5. 1. The 'Dark Age' of Greece Conventionally, the 'Dark Age' lasted 350-400 years. Of this, 200 years is here considered to be due to a chronological error, leaving a genuine period of 150-200 years during which famine and massive destruction decimated the population. As a result, few remains of monumental architecture have ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 72  -  05 Mar 2003  -  59k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v1998n1/14time.htm
78. Society News [SIS C&C Review $]
... to be able to welcome Bernard Newgrosh. Since retiring as C&CR editor after a considerable number of hectic years working for the Society, Bernard has been taking a well earned rest, so we were particularly happy to have been able to persuade him to present his meticulously considered ideas on an area of chronology which has proved to be a stumbling block for many a revisionist. Bernard Newgrosh kicked off proceedings with 'The Ashuruballit Problem'. Among the el Amarna tablets were two letters, Nos. 15 and 16, from an Assyrian king who called himself Ashuruballit. In No. 16, Ashuruballit, while asking for gold to be sent, refers to Ashur-nadin-ahhe as 'my ancestor'. From this letter, 'Ashuruballit' is conventionally considered to be either the Assyrian king who ruled before 1430BC, or the one who ruled 1400-1391 (or 1390-1381) [Moran p. 40 n. 9. So would-be revisionists, when they down-date the Amarna period, must also down-date this Assyrian king. Worse still, the Amarna letters include those from Babylonian kings Kadashman-Enlil and ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 72  -  05 Mar 2003  -  37k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v1998n2/52soc.htm
... chronology' (henceforth NC) although I have now been informed that he now finds its present form of development more acceptable. Rather than returning to the conventional chronology, Phillip sought to develop a scheme which allowed for some modest revision which he thought would nevertheless resolve all major obstacles faced both by the orthodox scheme and by the revisionists. Starting off with the simple conviction that the NC could not be right because it allows too little time for the Third Intermediate Period in Egypt and that it could never come to terms with the Assyrian and Babylonian chronologies (these convictions have been recently expressed more precisely by Phillip in Workshop [2), he naturally was very suspicious about any of our deduced synchronisms. One of these is undoubtedly my own equation of the term habiru in the el-Amarna Letters with the appellation 'ibrim in I Samuel [3. As I shall re-state below, many eminent scholars have indicated the striking analogy between these terms and the sets of documents describe historical conditions in Palestine normally thought to be some 350 years apart. The equation is the very ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 68  -  05 Mar 2003  -  35k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v1993/31ibrim.htm
80. Three Views of Heinsohn's Chronology [SIS C&C Workshop $]
... steatite scarabs, scimitars, horse-drawn chariots, weighty daggers, and glacis fortifications etc- but they never qualified for Akkadian. The perception of them as speakers of a Mesopotamian language appeared chronologically too horrifying to come to the minds of Egyptologists and Assyriologists alike. Why is the question of Thutmose III's teacher of Akkadian a problem at all? Because the Egyptians, like Hyksos and Old Hittites, could not bring themselves to use the West Semitic cuneiform of their immediate Martu predecessors who disappeared from history around 1600 BC and only re-emerged in 'Middle Assyrian' and Persian times, of the 13th and 6th centuries BC. The majority of the letters arriving at Amarna were written in an Akkadian a bit more developed than the Old Akkadian of the 24th century BC but, strangely enough, 'typologically more ancient, i.e., less simplified than the "older"' Old Babylonian (G. Wilhelm [1984, p. 649). Palaeographically, the Akkadian script of the Amarna archive (14th century BC) precedes the West Semitic cuneiform of the 20th to 17th century BC ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 68  -  05 Mar 2003  -  48k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/workshop/w1990no1/15views.htm
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