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Search results for: greek? in all categories

665 results found.

67 pages of results.
161. MYSTERY RELIGIONS [Quantavolution Website]
... seen in our discussion of Dionysus and the Delphic succession. It also helps to understand how Dionysus can have an alter ego, a child named Iacchos. Rhea was worshipped in Asia Minor as Meter Oreia, mountain-mother. She has other epithets derived from names of mountains. From Mount Berecyntos in Phrygia she is Berecyntia; from Mount Dindymon in Mysia, sacred to Cybele, she is Dindymene; and from Mount Ida she is called Idaia. In Phrygia she is known as Matar Kybele. According to Kerenyi, 'The Gods of the Greeks', she is the same as the Cretan 'Mistress of Animals', who appears flanked by two lions on top of a mountain. This reminds one of the Lion Gate at Mycenae, and raises the question of the significance of the two animals, and of the column between them which is Cretan in style. 'Kybelis', according to Hesychius, is a double-axe. Her procession has drums, pipes (or shawms or reed pipes, however one chooses to translate the word aulos), rattles, bull-roarers and male ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 16  -  03 Apr 2004  -  38k  -  URL: http://www.quantavolution.org/vol_12/ka_12.htm
... of soils and debris generally. The rich experience afforded by the excavations of Troy can serve to expose the problems that justify a new approach. Afterwards. we can define in a preliminary way the body of techniques that need to be assembled and developed. The "Burnt City" of Troy In some exciting passages, which have unquestionably been among the most widely read of all archaeological writing, Schliemann describes how, in May of 1873, he uncovered "The Treasure of Priam," King of Troy during the war between the Greeks and Trojans. (Neither his identification of the Treasure as Priam's nor of the City as the Troy of Homer is at issue here, and therefore these problems are passed over lightly.) Schliemann reports (4) that the "Trojans of whom Homer sings" occupied a stratum of debris "from 7 to 10 meters, or 23 to 33 feet, below the surface. This Trojan stratum, which, without exception, bears marks of great heat, consists mainly of red ashes of wood, which rise from 5 ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 16  -  05 Mar 2003  -  36k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0104/025paleo.htm
... named Typhon-- so who was Pliny alluding to? To answer this question we must have a look at Egyptian mythology which, among its many deities, speaks of a god who, somewhat similar to the Greek Typhon, also battled an entity in the sky. I am here, of course, alluding to Set who, inter alia, became famous for his fray with Horus. It is not that this battle is identical to that fought between the Greek Zeus and Typhon, but, rightly or wrongly, the ancient Greeks saw it that way. And, for that reason, in their own writings, they alluded to the Egyptian Set as Typhon. This can perhaps be best illustrated through Plutarch, who might have been the first to spell it out, when he referred to "the name of Set, by which they [the Egyptians call Typhon." [66 And: "the Egyptians always call Typhon Set." [67 Thus, when Diodorus wrote his history of Egypt for a Greek audience, he commenced with the well-known ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 16  -  05 Mar 2003  -  58k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0505/061comet.htm
164. Aphrodite from The Many Faces of Venus [Maverick Science Website]
... is no longer as all-pervasive as it once was, it is still very much alive, having been gradually sublimated and assimilated into countless niches of modern religious experience. It is well-known, for example, that various aspects of the mother goddess' cult have been absorbed by the worship of the Virgin Mary. 1 Robert Graves was surely right when he wrote of the mother goddess that she is "deeply fixed in the racial memory of the European countryman and impossible to exorcize." 2 Among the ancient cultures, it is the Greeks who have preserved some of the most compelling portraits of the goddess. Mere mention of the names Aphrodite, Medea, Scylla, Hecate, Ariadne, and Athena is enough to evoke images of archetypal significance. Each of these figures represents, as it were, a face from the ancient gallery of the mother goddess, offering respectively a crystallized view of the goddess as Queen of Heaven, sorceress, harpy, witch, captive maiden, and warrior. At first glance, the aforementioned figures would appear to have little in common ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 16  -  08 Sep 2006  -  70k  -  URL: http://www.maverickscience.com/venus-aphrodite.htm
165. SKY LINKS [Quantavolution Website]
... of chaos. The main features of the Greek myths dealing with cosmogony are: marriage of earth and sky; production of a succession of monsters and giants; a succession of gods; theomachy (battles of gods with gods and with giants and monsters); allocation of spheres of influence; interference with the earth by extraterrestrial bodies and forces. The overall picture has much in common with myths from all over the world. It is important to note that these myths appear at first as history; only later were they interpreted by Greeks and then by modern scholars as anthropomorphic descriptions of natural phenomena, or projections of human psychic activities. The followers of Orpheus taught that the start of the order of the world as they knew it was Aither, upper air, and Chaos, yawning gulf. Night and the wind produced an egg, and from the egg emerged a shining creature, Eros, whose name means love. (Night was the first to prophesy at Delphi as we shall see later). Eros was the same as Phanes, the revealer. ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 16  -  03 Apr 2004  -  28k  -  URL: http://www.quantavolution.org/vol_12/ka_06.htm
... of soils and debris generally. The rich experience afforded by the excavations of Troy can serve to expose the problems that justify a new approach. Afterwards, we can define in a preliminary way the body of techniques that needs to be assembled and developed. THE "BURNT CITY" OF TROY In some exciting passages, which have unquestionably been among the most widely read of all archaeological writing, Schliemann describes how, in May of 1873, he uncovered "The treasure of Priam," King of Troy during the war between the Greeks and Trojans. (Neither his identification of the Treasure as Priam's nor of the City as the Troy of Homer is at issue here, and therefore these problems are passed over lightly.) Schliemann reports [5 that the "Trojans of whom Homer sings" occupied a stratum of debris "from 7 to 10 meters, or 23 to 33 feet, below the surface. This Trojan stratum, which, without exception, bears marks of great heat, consists mainly of red ashes of wood, which rise from 5 to ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 16  -  03 Apr 2004  -  72k  -  URL: http://www.quantavolution.org/vol_11/burning_of_troy_p1_02.htm
167. The Prophetic Tradition [SIS Internet Digest $]
... Prophetic Tradition. We believe that this approach will harmonize science, religion, and myth and provide answers to many, if not all, the questions regarding our past. It will also provide a very clear picture of our near future. Greco-Roman accounts do have the trappings of fable and myth. But, when read with a literal eye, are very clear in their meaning. Long ago, the planets in the heavens were "running amok" (Metamorphoses 2:203) and the earth suffered the consequences. But the Greeks and Romans were not the only ones who knew of Phaethon. Plato's citation of the Egyptian priest suggests that the Egyptian also knew the story: "...the story current also in your part of the world..." In pre-Columbian America, the Bella Coola Indians relate a story, where a child of the Sun asks to carry his father's torches. The Sun acquiesced. Unfortunately, this "Phaethon" kindled all the torches and did so too early. As a result, the earth became red hot, forests ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 15  -  05 Mar 2003  -  4k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/i-digest/1997-2/04proph.htm
168. Ra as Saturn [SIS Internet Digest $]
... ancient astronomical lore, by reference to the PRESENT celestial arrangement, not even imagining that the ancients could have been alluding to a sky that was entirely different from ours. Thus, Diodorus Siculus, who lived in the first century B.C., had reason to report that the Chaldeans regarded Saturn as the most prominent of the planets: "But above all in importance [he wrote they [the Chaldeans say, is the study of the influence of the five stars known as planets... the one named Cronus by the Greeks [i.e. Saturn... is the most conspicuous... "( 28) As viewed from Earth, this is simply not so. Venus is much more prominent. It is easily the brightest of the planets, bright enough at night to cast shadows and, when meteorological conditions permit, bright enough to be seen during the day. In contradistinction, Saturn is a very difficult object to observe. But if the object the Egyptians called Ra was Saturn... rather than the Sun, as believed ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 15  -  06 Mar 2003  -  19k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/i-digest/1997-2/15ra.htm
169. Chapter I: The Worship of the Sun and the Dawn [Dawn of Astronomy (Book)] [Books]
... not stated, and it does not matter. We must not consider this as ridiculous, and pardonable merely because it is so early in point of time; because, coming to the time of Greek civilisation, Anaximander told us that the earth was cylindrical in shape, and every place that was then known was situated on the flat end of the cylinder; and Plato, on the ground that the cube was the most perfect geometrical figure, imagined the earth to be a cube, the part of the earth known to the Greeks being on the upper surface. In these matters, indeed, the vaunted Greek mind was little in advance of the predecessors of the Vedic priests. Notes Maspero," Histoire ancienne des Peuples de l'Orient," p. 136. ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 15  -  25 Mar 2001  -  15k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/books/dawn/dawn01.htm
170. Worknotes on the Joshua Impact Event [SIS Internet Digest $]
... the impact event set out in the biblical book of Joshua. Recently I have been working on some material which appears to provide independent corroborative evidence as to the historicity of this event and as to its date and location. From the evidence, it appears that there was an impact event in about 1584 BC, just to the west of what is now Jerusalem, and that this Nagasaki-sized impact destroyed the military forces of a large number of Hittite appendages, which were under the command of the Hittite king T'Hantilish, known to the Greeks as Tantalus. So far I have three independent sources for this event, a summary of which follows, (including contemporary Hittite records, second summary below), as well as a broad archaeological sequence that supports the occurrence of this impact event. The first written source for the event, one with which the conference participants are probably familiar, is the biblical book of Joshua, which is admittedly quite distant from the event itself. To summarize once again the account there, the Israelites leave Egypt at the time of the ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 15  -  05 Mar 2003  -  6k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/i-digest/1998-1/09work.htm
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