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Search results for: etymolog* in all categories

170 results found.

17 pages of results.
11. Chronos And Kronos [Kronos $]
... to have as his province the intervals and cycles of time. In Greek this god is called by the very word time, since Kronos is the same as chronos, that is, time. We call him Saturnus because he saturates himself with years." The etymological connection of the two words Kronos and chronos has been positively affirmed by some linguists and strongly denied by others, because, on the one hand, the semantic similarity of the two words is evident and, on the other, from a technical linguistic point of ... , the difference between the K and the ch is most significant. The debate is still unsettled; if the two words are etymologically related, the common element is indicated by the Greek word geron, "old man". \cdrom\pubs\journals\kronos\vol0702\041chron.htm ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 135  -  05 Mar 2003  -  3k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0702/041chron.htm
... OC." I said "O. K." I looked at it, remembered the mystery of its origin, and thought "This O. K. could be OC, the most ancient Irish god-name." I read in the Oxford English Dictionary on Etymological Principles (Vol. II p. 4028 of microprint edition), "the earliest occurrence so far noted is in the Boston Transcript of 15 April 1840. In this and two examples from April and June the meaning is not clear, but the explanation oll ... and is found in Yahweh and Jove (properly pronounced in Latin). The most sacred parish in Ireland is called Aughaval, which disassembles into og/ ava/ ala. Now H. L. Mencken comments about O. K. that "its long disputed etymology has been practically settled by Allen Walker Read." Not so, although Read wrote three articles, and Mencken one, on the subject between 1941 and 1963. He is probably correct, though, in saying that "it arose from a vogue for acronyms ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 135  -  03 Apr 2004  -  9k  -  URL: http://www.quantavolution.org/vol_11/burning_of_troy_p3_20.htm
13. The Egyptologist's Electronic Forum [SIS Internet Digest $]
... institutions (jobs, lectures, etc.). January 1999: 1. Circumcision: circumcision in AE, with an excursus to counting dead foes. 2. Dyn. 13-14: literature dealing with the Second Intermediate Period. 3. Etymology and ankh symbol: etymological theories for _( w)S(3)(w)btj_, _'nx_ and _wsjr_, and literature dealing with the 'ankh' and 'was' symbols. 4. Arks and priest: musings about the side-locks and leopard-skins worn by priests ... new books), by institutions (jobs, lectures, etc.). January 1999: 1. Circumcision: circumcision in AE, with an excursus to counting dead foes. 2. Dyn. 13-14: literature dealing with the Second Intermediate Period. 3. Etymology and ankh symbol: etymological theories for _( w)S(3)(w)btj_, _'nx_ and _wsjr_, and literature dealing with the 'ankh' and 'was' symbols. 4. Arks and priest: musings about the side-locks ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 135  -  05 Mar 2003  -  3k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/i-digest/1999-1/02egypt.htm
14. Star Words [SIS Internet Digest $]
... at the moment. Thus I would be most interested to learn how Dr. Wescott relates "star" to the word "stare" (which root?) and which Semitic root he would offer as a source for Ishtar/Astarte. ROGER clarifies: All etymologies are probabilistic at best. Besides "strew", the English forms most likely to be cognate with "star" are "strong" and "steady", to either or both of which "stare" may be related. EV says: It goes ... 4 reasons: (1) these forms are wide-spread in I.E. but not in Sem.; (2) revised chronology no longer requires us to regard written Akkadian as older than Hittite; (3) I.E., unlike Sem., permits an internal etymology for "star", relating it to English "stare" and other verbs expressing strength and persistence; and (4) Afrasian language families related to Sem., such as Cushitic and Ancient Egyptian, fail to exhibit forms with this shape and meaning ( ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 135  -  05 Mar 2003  -  10k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/i-digest/2000-1/16star.htm
15. I Samuel and the Habiru Problem [SIS C&C Workshop $]
... 'Late Bronze Age Phenomenon'. Nowhere is the equation better illustrated than in the parallel between the band of men assembled by David and the Habiru of southern Canaan of the Amarna correspondence. This thesis is comprehensive in its scope, as witness its detailed examination of the etymological arguments exploring a relation between Habiru and Ibrim. 'Ibri' turns out to derive from 'habaru' (= to migrate) and 'the act of migration would appear to link all habiru'. Van der Veen's work is completed with an Appendix detailing the documents referring ... e.g. who were they in practice, the whole of Israel or only part of that community. Some assumptions, e.g. that the Habiru were a non-settled element (as per Aharoni) are probably not justified. Their claim that the Habiru and Ibrim may be etymologically related is not documented with adequate evidence. This is constructive criticism, for van der Veen proceeds to examine each of these issues in depth, and his conclusion that the Habiru and Ibrim do broadly correspond to one another is strongly supportive to the New Chronology. ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 135  -  05 Mar 2003  -  9k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/workshop/w1990no1/33sam.htm
16. Vox Popvli [Aeon Journal $]
... Southbury, Connecticut, adds: Thanks for AEON V:1. I appreciated the rich illustration of my Quantalism article. [8 And I was intrigued by Tania ta Maria's pithy inserts. Re Old Irish grian, that is "sun": There is no etymological mystery here. The word comes from Proto-Indo-European *g h rei-- "shine" or "glim-mer"-- and is cognate with English "grey." Notes [1 See, AEON III:3 (October 1993), pp. 49 ... than has yet been allotted to it. Even so, these ideas should be aired, and I thank Ms. Perkins for bringing them up. Ogam and Grain Richard M. Smith, from Banning, California, writes: In dealing with my question regarding the etymology of Gaelic grian, that is "sun," [7 Dwardu Cardona stated that Ogam/Ogham is a form of Goidelic. However, Goidelic is a language while Ogam is a writing system that was occasionally used for other languages besides Goidelic. Cardona also ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 135  -  05 Mar 2003  -  8k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0503/005vox.htm
17. INTRODUCTION [Quantavolution Website]
... behavior in the sky. In the end, this work by Crosthwaite, which we may call a Handbook, took on its own form. It is a dismemberment and reconstruction of Greek and associated myth such as has not occurred hitherto. Its hundreds of sketches and etymologies are grouped to follow a theme: the electric fire and destructive behavior of the sky gods, as these exhibit themselves in the language, rituals, myths, and behavior of the ancient Mediterranean peoples. A surprising form of "Handbook" emerges, which renders ... are seen good fortune and misfortune, and the sages made symbols of them." (Sec. 1, Ch. 11) Furthermore, this same "divinely inspired" language, along with the rites and practices associated with it, does not consist of independent etymologically-unique, tribally evolved vocabularies and perspectives. Rather, there appears to have been, among many ancient peoples, an ecumenical language of sacred, electrical, pyrotechnical ritual behavior. Apparently, what had been happening, not long before the time our evidence comes into being ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 135  -  03 Apr 2004  -  8k  -  URL: http://www.quantavolution.org/vol_12/ka_intro.htm
... also represented as bearded --Venus Barbata --a shocking revelation to modern romantics weaned on cinematic images of the celebrated goddess of love. (7) The beard of Venus would also appear to be reflected in the linguistic heritage of the Indo-European peoples. Thus, in Pokorny's Indogermanisches Etymologisches Worterbuch, one finds that *uendh signifies "beard," a word which shares the root *uen, regarded by Pokorny and others as that found in the name of Venus. (8) It goes without saying that linguistic scholars, unaware of the ... a fitting designation for a celebrated goddess of love, but one which appears to be derivative, rather than original, in nature. It is my opinion that other meanings associated with this and similar roots should be considered, not so much for the final word in etymology, but for the additional light which they might be able to cast on the origins of Venus' cult. If the analysis of Talbott and myself is on the right track, the proto-planet Venus spent a portion of its history in close proximity to the band-like ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 125  -  05 Mar 2003  -  51k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0101/02venus.htm
19. Spatters And Planetary Iconography [The Velikovskian $]
... op. cit., p. 15. 21. Raspil, op. cit., p. 59. 22. Vaughm M. Greene, Astronauts of Ancient Japan (Millbrae, California, 1978). 23. Eric Partridge, Origins, A Short Etymological Dictionary of Modern English (New York, 1983), p. 321, under join. 24. Maurice Bessy, A Pictorial History of Magic and the Supernatural (London, England, 1964), fig. 514. 25. Richard Cavendish, " ... of the Chariot (often depicted as black and white, male and female, yin and yang) remain yoked together, the Chariot (just like the plough) will go forward and work effectively. Now for a synchronicity. The words yoga and yogi are related etymologically to the English yoke, which derives etymologically from the Latin iunctio, which, when placed together with the prefix con, becomes coniunctio, Latin for conjunction. (23) Therefore, the lotus or yoga position in which we find so many gods depicted is ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 121  -  05 Mar 2003  -  52k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/velikov/vol0204/spatters.htm
20. Hereditary Monarchy in Assyria and the Assyrian Kinglist [Catastrophism & Ancient History Journal $]
... "father." "son," and "brother" (abu, p1. Abbu; maru, ahu). 11 We must emphasize that these terms in such short inscriptions are usually very significant. The Etymology of "Father" Let us begin our etymological research concerning the Akkadian word for father by considering the English words. Although you may at first consider this absurd, you will soon see it is quite instructive. 13 We quote in full the current English meanings for the word father from our dictionary: a ... context? We shall presently consider these terms, "father." "son," and "brother" (abu, p1. Abbu; maru, ahu). 11 We must emphasize that these terms in such short inscriptions are usually very significant. The Etymology of "Father" Let us begin our etymological research concerning the Akkadian word for father by considering the English words. Although you may at first consider this absurd, you will soon see it is quite instructive. 13 We quote in full the current English meanings ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 121  -  05 Mar 2003  -  37k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/cat-anc/proc1/39hered.htm
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