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Search results for: babylonian in all categories

681 results found.

69 pages of results.
101. Assuruballit [Velikovsky Archive Website]
... 6) When the el-Amarna letters were found in 1881 they were ascribed to the fourteenth century because they were partly addressed to Amenhotep III and Akhnaton. Since these kings, by the conventional chronology, were placed in the 14th century, the Assyrian king Assuruballit was looked for in the then available king lists. Thus, the desire to find the names mentioned in his letters in the king lists was already there. This required quite a bit of stretching. In 1917 Weidner admitted: The dates we have established for the Assyrian and Babylonian kings do not fit those established by Egyptian historians for the dates of the Egyptian kings. (7) In order to make the reign of Assuruballit and the time of these pharaohs contemporaneous, it was necessary to shift both chronologies, the Egyptian and the Assyrian. The Amarna Period, in order to meet the the earlier found king lists, (8) was moved back into the 15th century. For, as Professor Mahler brought out, the leveling of these histories required the placing of Amenhotep III at the end of ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 36  -  31 Aug 2000  -  39k  -  URL: http://www.varchive.org/ce/assuruballit.htm
102. Intimations of an Alien Sky [Aeon Journal $]
... representing the motions of the heavenly bodies, were much in vogue at the time. These continued to record the recurrence of astronomical phenomena, year by year, "with an accuracy comparable with that of contemporary observations." (21) There is no great wonder in all of this, but it does prove one point, banal as it may seem, that shall be stressed time and again in the pages that follow-- and that is this: Beginning from at least the middle of the seventh century B.C., Babylonian astronomers knew very well what these pin points of light called planets looked like and could easily distinguish one from the other; they knew where every planet belonged in the sky and what track each one of them invariably followed-- an easy matter for anyone with a keen eye-sight plus the patience and the motivation to learn. Yes, I know, it is hardly even worth mentioning. And yet, Diodorus Siculus, who lived in the first century B.C., had reason to report that the Chaldeans regarded Saturn as the ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 36  -  05 Mar 2003  -  109k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0205/005alien.htm
103. Suns and Planets in Neolithic Rock Art [Maverick Science Website]
... believed to exist between Shamash, Sin and Ishtar, the divine triad of ancient Babylon.28 Although the crescent of Sin is readily understandable given the god's customary identification with the Moon, why the ancient Babylonians would have represented the sun with this particular symbol is difficult to explain. The same image, moreover, is frequently found perched atop a pillar-like structure, raising further questions as to the objective basis of the image.29 Remembering the pillar-like appendage associated with early "sun" images in prehistoric rock art, one can't help but wonder whether the Babylonian symbol of Shamash atop his pillar-like staff represents a stylized vestige of the former 30 Figure 6 Elsewhere, however, Shamash could be represented by another symbol which features an eight-pointed star set against a circular disc (see Figure 7 ).31 Figure 7 Here too, it must be admitted, it is difficult to see much resemblance between this image and the current solar orb. Why the ancient Babylonians would elect to represent their sun-god Shamash with an 8-pointed star is a question which bears careful consideration. Indeed, a satisfactory answer could portend ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 36  -  08 Sep 2006  -  53k  -  URL: http://www.maverickscience.com/arch-sun-planets.htm
... Ishtar, the divine triad of ancient Babylon. (28) Although the crescent of Sin is readily understandable given the god's customary identification with the Moon, why the ancient Babylonians would have represented the sun with this particular symbol is difficult to explain. The same image, moreover, is frequently found perched atop a pillar-like structure, raising further questions as to the objective basis of the image. (29) Remembering the pillar-like appendage associated with early "sun" images in prehistoric rock art, one can't help but wonder whether the Babylonian symbol of Shamash atop his pillar-like staff represents a stylized vestige of the former? (30) Figure 6 Figure 7 Elsewhere, however, Shamash could be represented by another symbol which features an eight-pointed star set against a circular disc (see Figure 7). (31) Here too, it must be admitted, it is difficult to see much resemblance between this image and the current solar orb. Why the ancient Babylonians would elect to represent their sun-god Shamash with an 8-pointed star is a question which bears careful consideration. ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 36  -  05 Mar 2003  -  52k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0302/051suns.htm
105. Letters [SIS C&C Review $]
... object. The only external object at present close to the Earth is the Moon. The pull of the Moon acts at a tangent to the Earth's surface; but it is only at two points at right angles to the Moon's path that forces can build up sufficiently to cause any damage. Normally, the Earth's crust is quite rigid enough to resist the lunar forces, but if there happens to be a weakness in the crust, an earthquake might result. Moreover, the pull of the Moon is inwards towards itself. The Babylonian event is, at least, consistent with the movement which might be expected if the Moon was indeed the cause. The Egyptian event, on the other hand, has the movement in the wrong direction. It could not have been caused by the Moon. If we assume an external object, it was a visitor from space. Alternatively, we might assume that forces in the Earth's crust had built up over the years as a result of continental drift, eventually something gave, and a movement of the crust took place ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 36  -  05 Mar 2003  -  23k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v1994/59letts.htm
106. The Crescent [The Saturn Myth] [Books]
... (1) But why should Saturn possess the "new moon" as his weapon? The connection appears to be very old, for it occurs also in ancient Babylonia. Ninurta, the planet Saturn, hold in his hands a weapon called SAR-UR-U-SAR-GAZ, and also BAB-BA-NU-IL-LA. The first name of Ninurta's weapon means "who governs the Cosmos and who massacres the Cosmos," while the second name means "hurricane which spares nothing." The astonishing fact is this: these names of Saturn's weapon are the very epithets of the Babylonian Sin, the crescent "Moon." (2) That is, the crescent of Sin is the "weapon" (sickle, sword) with which Saturn founded and destroyed the primeval order. But there is another peculiarity also: though always identified by scholars as the lunar sphere, Sin is never presented as a "half-moon," "three quarters moon" or "full moon." He is simply Udsar "the crescent." And however incongruous the relationship might appear today, Babylonian art continually presents Sin ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 36  -  15 Nov 2001  -  119k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/books/saturn/ch-09.htm
... continue to maintain that the story of Sardanapalus contains elements of the historical Pul; however the Greek tales are no more than folklore and should not be taken at face value. The connection between Pul and Sardanapalus has no bearing whatsoever on the separate existence of Pul. The basic thesis of the non-identity of Pul and Tiglath-Pileser (which is not original to me) still stands. Jonsson [2 has three arguments against this: 1. The two years that Tiglath-Pileser reigned over Babylon (his last two years) are attributed by the Babylonian King List A to Pul. 2. Tiglath-Pileser records the receipt of tribute from Menahem, while the Bible says he paid tribute to Pul. 3. The clear evidence of I Chronicles 5:26, which mentions Pul and Tiglath-Pileser as separate individuals, can and should be seen as supporting their identity. The biblical chronology of the kings is sufficiently subject to interpretation that it cannot be used to disprove this identification. 1. Babylonian King List A I suggested in the JCIM that there was a politically expedient reason why Tiglath-Pileser ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 36  -  05 Mar 2003  -  25k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/workshop/w1995no1/23pul.htm
108. Assuruballit [Kronos $]
... 6) When the el-Amarna letters were found in 1881 they were ascribed to the fourteenth century because they were partly addressed to Amenhotep III and Akhnaton. Since these kings, by the conventional chronology, were placed in the 14th century, the Assyrian king Assuruballit was looked for in the then available king lists. Thus, the desire to find the names mentioned in his letters in the king lists was already there. This required quite a bit of stretching. In 1917 Weidner admitted: The dates we have established for the Assyrian and Babylonian kings do not fit those established by Egyptian historians for the dates of the Egyptian kings.(7) In order to make the reign of Assuruballit and the time of these pharaohs contemporaneous, it was necessary to shift both chronologies, the Egyptian and the Assyrian. The Amarna Period, in order to meet the the earlier found king lists,(8) was moved back into the 15th century. For, as Professor Mahler brought out, the levelling of these histories required the placing of Amenhotep III at the end of ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 36  -  05 Mar 2003  -  29k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol1203/003assur.htm
... pseudoscience: 'everything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.'"-- David Whitehouse, New Scientist, 7 April 1983 In a review of Bauer's book in Nature (April 25, 1985), Owen Gingerich observed: "Although science cannot prove a Velikovskian scenario is impossible, it might well prove that it did not happen." This is a point Bauer had been reluctant to concede because so many "disproofs" have been either indeterminate or wrong. For Gingerich, Peter Huber's analysis of the Babylonian Venus Tablets in Scientists Confront Velikovsky (Ithaca, 1977) provides the crucial evidence. The small change in eccentricity for Earth indicated by the tablets, according to Rose and Vaughan's analysis, does not necessarily imply an Earth-crossing orbit for either Venus or Mars within the past 3500 years, or ever: It is consistent with but does not demand such orbits. Now, a change that is merely consistent with the sequence of planetary orbits implied by Worlds in Collision is really very weak as evidence. Ideally, what one would like ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 36  -  05 Mar 2003  -  84k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0301/086potpo.htm
... period before the Exodus. So the historical Job almost certainly lived in pre-Exodus times, somewhere between the 18th and 15th centuries BC. As we shall see, abundant and unambiguous motifs in the book of Job point to a very early, and quite possibly pre-Exodus, date. Could the book of Job, then, have been written so early, in its original form? Parallels to the work's anguished and sceptically realistic insight into the nature and apparent injustice of human suffering can be found in other early cultures, as in the Babylonian wisdom literature of the Kassite period (8); an even earlier example of the "Job motif" of the righteous sufferer is known from the Sumerian literature of Mesopotamia (9). While these treatments are inferior in style and depth of theological insight, they are sure evidence that the kind of conceptual thought found in the book of Job was not out of place in such an early period as between the 18th and 15th centuries BC. Indeed, there is no good reason for believing that the book of Job is ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 36  -  05 Mar 2003  -  48k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v0104/17job.htm
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