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Search results for: assyrian in all categories

601 results found.

61 pages of results.
11. Sardanapallus and Arbaces [Catastrophism & Ancient History Journal $]
... From: Catastrophism and Ancient History X:1 (Jan 1988) Home¦ Issue Contents Sardanapallus and Arbaces Arie Dirkzwager In the Philippian Histories of Pompeius Trogus, as the work came to us abridged by Justinus, we read in the first book some remarkable facts about Assyrian history. Always keen to detect alternative connections in Ancient History, in order to establish more details of the new chronology, we can search for-- or should pay attention to-- whatever seems to baffle orthodox scholars. According to Pompeius Trogus, who probably relied on the works of Ctesias, Nineveh was founded by Ninus, a king who expanded the empire of the Assyrians. He made war with Zarathustra, king of Bactria, and died thereafter. His son Ninias was very young, so his wife Semiramis undertook the royal task. She pretended, however, to be a man, waged several wars, reigned 32 years, and was killed by Ninias. The new king was content with the empire, he inherited and preferred to live luxuriously. The next king mentioned ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 165  -  05 Mar 2003  -  9k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/cat-anc/vol1001/31sarda.htm
... later became the planet Venus) passed close to the Earth about 1450 B.C. This near collision, he argued, produced world-wide earthquakes, tidal waves, pestilence, and other catastrophes. It also caused [a temporary halt in the Earth's rotation. Velikovsky further asserted that these catastrophic events are reflected in the Biblical accounts of the Exodus and of the Sun standing still for a day during the Israelite conquest of Canaan. The cosmic catastrophes were supposedly repeated in the eighth century B.C. Velikovsky thought them responsible for the destruction of the Assyrian army of Sennacherib who was besieging Jerusalem at that time (II Kings 18: 13-19: 36). Velikovsky's views were immediately attacked by scientists, particularly astronomers, who rejected his theories of astronomical catastrophes in recent times. Feelings ran so high that some scientists even attempted to prevent the publication or distribution of Velikovsky's works- a regrettable departure from the ideal of academic freedom. For Biblical scholars and ancient historians the most significant part of Velikovsky's theories is his reconstruction of ancient chronology. As the letter from Mr. Denis notes ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 164  -  05 Mar 2003  -  48k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0703/071bar.htm
... ), and the first Iron Age buildings at Samaria are unanimously agreed to be the work of Omri and Ahab (9th century BC). (Velikovsky himself has never questioned the conventional dating of these levels; his argument concerning the Menkheperre scarabs, noted above, depends on the assumption that pottery currently assigned to the 10th century BC is correctly dated, and his discussion of the ivories from Samaria [9 assumes that their attribution to the time of Ahab is correct.) Furthermore, Stiebing has implied that the context in which Assyrian objects occur in Palestine rules out any redating of Iron Age levels [10. Each of these points will be discussed below, and we will find that the apparent problems can be readily resolved. Palestine's LBA and Iron Age strata can be redated in the manner required by Velikovsky's placement of the XVIIIth Dynasty, and this redating is in fact attested independently by a great deal of archaeological evidence. We must begin in the LBA. 2. A Theoretical Solution Comparison of (A) LB II (Stratum Ib) temple at ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 160  -  06 Mar 2003  -  77k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v0601to3/16chron.htm
... for nine years from the 12th year of Ahaz. (12) Hezekiah ruled 29 years from the third year of Hoshea. (13) During the seventh year of Hoshea and the fourth year of Hezekiah, Samaria came under siege by the king of Assyria. Israel was conquered by Assyria in the ninth year of Hoshea and the sixth year of Hezekiah. (14) Sargon II recorded that he had attacked Samaria in his first year. (15) Sargon's first year in Babylonia was 701. He had ascended to the Assyrian throne 12 years earlier. He and Marduk-baladan II of Babylonia had ascended to the throne in the same year, and, 12 years later, Sargon II conquered Babylonia. (16) Sargon II started to reign in 714, four years after Tiglath-pileser III died. His 12th year was 702. A year later, in 701, he attacked Samaria. Here, the year 701 corresponds exactly with the seventh year of Hoshea (707- 6= 701) and the fourth year of Hezekiah (704- 3= 701 ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 159  -  05 Mar 2003  -  163k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/velikov/vol0203/june15.htm
... this vast and complicated subject. Heinsohn, of course, is not the first to offer such a drastic reconstruction and, human nature being what it is, he will not be the last. In the past, none of these historical reconstructions, from that of Immanuel Velikovsky to the Glasgow Chronology, has withstood the test of scholarly analysis. The question here is: Will Heinsohn's? Six major periods, about which volumes have been written, come under the direct influence of Heinsohn's hypothesis. These are the Akkadian, Amorite, Assyrian, Chaldean, Persian, and Sumerian civilizations. According to Heinsohn, three of these constitute ghost empires, their pseudo-history having been compiled from the replicated events of the other three. Thus Heinsohn argues that the Sumerians were actually the Chaldeans, the Akkadians were the Assyrians, and the Amorites were the Persians. (1) In an attempt to test this hypothesis, Charles Ginenthal selected a portion of Akkadian history and compared it with what, in Heinsohn's scheme, would be the parallel Assyrian version. What he unearthed in a ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 159  -  05 Mar 2003  -  111k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0105/005sarg.htm
16. Expanding the End of Assyrian History [Catastrophism & Ancient History Journal $]
... From: Catastrophism and Ancient History VI:1 (Jan 1984) Home¦ Issue Contents INTERACTION Expanding the End of Assyrian History Arie Dirkzwager In letters to the editors of several journals (1) Christoph Marx has drawn our attention to the fact that if we have to assume changes in the earth's movement during the 8th and 7th centuries, we cannot take the date of 15-6-763 B.C. as an anchor of ancient chronology. The Assyrian eponym list lost its astronomically fixed absolute date. That list therefore gives us material of only relative value. The fact is important, for now one is not obliged to squeeze Assyrian history from the solar eclipse formerly attributed to 763 until the fall of Nineveh between the years 763 and 612. It is well known that from the end of the reign of Assurbanipal Assyrian chronology is instable. To Assurbanipal 42 years are attributed by an Assyrian text. That means that in orthodox chronology he should have been king until 627/6. (2) When we would take the years attributed by the sources to the successors of ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 150  -  05 Mar 2003  -  4k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/cat-anc/vol0601/45expand.htm
17. The Synchronistic Chronical: A Critique [Catastrophism & Ancient History Journal $]
... Courville states: [2 [T he obvious fact that must be recognised is that either the traditional chronology of this era is in gross error, or else the Synchronistic Chronicle document, which has served to provide the very backbone of ancient chronology, requires gross modification. Certainly a construction that does not demand any such rejection of inscriptive evidence should be recognised as a preferred structure. Yet Dr. Courville does not ask if both could be in error. The portion of the Chronicle that concerns us here covers the period of the Assyrian kings Adasi to Assur-saduni-- kings 47-64 on the Khorsabad king-list, dated 1648-1430,[3 Aligned parallel to these monarchs are, first, kings of the Dynasty of the Sealand and then the early Kassite kings. Attested synchronizations demonstrate a partial overlap between the first three Babylonian dynasties. Since the Chronicle begins with the Assyrian king Adasi and the Sealand king Damiqilishu, it would appear that the Amorite or First Dynasty was regarded as predating the period covered by the Chronicle. Under the proposals envisaged by Dr. Courville this dynasty ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 150  -  05 Mar 2003  -  16k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/cat-anc/vol0602/093sync.htm
18. Assuruballit [Velikovsky Archive Website]
... Assuruballit (1) There are two letters in the el-Amarna collection signed by Assuruballit. These letters, though rather unimportant, are given much attention by the chronologists, not for their content, but for the name of their author. Assuruballit is not an unusual name, but the existence of an Assuruballit in the fourteenth century would link the Assyrian king lists with the Egyptian dynasties of the New Kingdom. Thus, the letters play an important role in conventional chronology, being the sole link in the space of many centuries between the Egyptian and Assyrian histories. In Assyria were found king lists in which the names of the kings and the number of years of their reigns are given, and nothing more. The extant versions of the lists are of a later origin, since they give the succession until the end period of the Assyrian Kingdom. If in the Assyrian lists there is a king who wrote letters to a pharaoh known by name, then a first and single link in the space of many centuries could be established between Egypt and Assyria. And ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 140  -  31 Aug 2000  -  39k  -  URL: http://www.varchive.org/ce/assuruballit.htm
19. Assuruballit [Kronos $]
... From: Kronos Vol. XII No. 3 (Spring 1988) Home¦ Issue Contents Assuruballit Immanuel Velikovsky Copyright© 1987 by the Estate of Immanuel Velikovsky See note (1) There are two letters in the el-Amarna collection signed by Assuruballit. These letters, though rather unimportant, are given much attention by the chronologists, not for their content, but for the name of their author. Assuruballit is not an unusual name, but the existence of an Assuruballit in the fourteenth century would link the Assyrian king lists with the Egyptian dynasties of the New Kingdom. Thus, the letters play an important role in conventional chronology, being the sole link in the space of many centuries between the Egyptian and Assyrian histories. In Assyria were found king lists in which the names of the kings and the number of years of their reigns are given, and nothing more. The extant versions of the lists are of a later origin, since they give the succession until the end period of the Assyrian Kingdom. If in the Assyrian lists there is a king who ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 140  -  05 Mar 2003  -  29k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol1203/003assur.htm
20. A New Interpretation of the Assyrian King List [Catastrophism & Ancient History Journal $]
... From: Proceedings of The Third Seminar of Catastrophism and Ancient History (1986) Home¦ Issue Contents A New Interpretation of the Assyrian King List Lester J. Mitcham Over the last few decades a number of scholars have speculated that the history of the ancient Near East, as presently interpreted, is in need of revision. While considerable attention has been focused on the problem of the apparent elongation of Egyptian chronology, caused in part by the now disproved synchronism between Shoshenk I and the Judean king Rehoboam, the area of Mesopotamia has largely been ignored. Like Egypt, southern Mesopotamia was ruled by a series of dynasties, many of which-- originally thought to have been successive-- have been determined to be at least partially contemporaneous. When one turns to the problem of northern Mesopotamia, however, he is confronted by the Assyrian King List (hereafter AKL), a document of which several versions exist-- all of late composition-- and which presents, from a relatively early time until the period of the divided monarchy in Israel/ ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 139  -  05 Mar 2003  -  26k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/cat-anc/proc3/51king.htm
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