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Search results for: aborigin* in all categories

159 results found.

16 pages of results.
11. Morning Star II [Aeon Journal $]
... Both ascend to the sky and, while one becomes the Morning Star, the other turns into the planet Mars. The implication that the Morning Star was Mars seems clear and in keeping with the thesis presented above. As Allan Beggs, who has been studying Australian Aboriginal lore these past several years, recently stated: "None of these stories appears to depict anything at all about the present-day movements or appearance of Venus and Mars but they do fit the Talbott model remarkably well. In all my reading and studying I have never ... he was alluded to as the Morning Star, but the implication of his character is clear enough. MULLYAN AND WAIJUNGARI Although the Australian hero mentioned above is not identified as the celestial body of our present interest, the Morning Star and Mars are not unknown to the Aborigines of that land. And it is to the mythological lore of these primitive peoples that I wish to turn next in an endeavor to strengthen the case presented above. The trailing ejecta discharged by both Venus and Mars as they dropped from the Saturnian center took the ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 277  -  05 Mar 2003  -  59k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0402/036star.htm
12. The Female Star [Aeon Journal $]
... Koran, which describes the transfiguration of a young woman into the beautiful star Zohra, the latter being the Arabic name for Venus. [11 As Puhvel points out, related accounts name this young woman Anahid. [12 The same basic idea is found among the aboriginal peoples of Siberia, where the Yakut knew the planet by the name Colbon, envisaged as a beautiful girl. [13 A legend first recorded in the last century goes as follows: "She is the bride and sweetheart of Satan's son-- Ürgel ( ... the stars, the various planets playing a conspicuous role in their sacred tales, rituals, and artwork. [22 There, too, the planet Venus appears to have been viewed as a female being: "The Morning Star was also an important sign to the Aborigines who arose at early dawn to begin their hunting. It, too, was personified and frequently associated with death. Arnhem Land legends identify the home of the morning star, Barnumbir, as Bralgu, the Island of the Dead. Barnumbir was so afraid of ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 273  -  05 Mar 2003  -  81k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0503/049star.htm
13. Letters [SIS C&C Workshop $]
... .) Nicholas J. G. Sykes, Cayman Islands, B. W. I. Child of Saturn Dear Sir, Without wishing to take sides in the debate of whether Venus was born of Jupiter or Saturn, I feel obliged to forward these curious Australian Aboriginal comments on Jupiter and Venus which are taken from the book Australian Dreaming published in 1980 under the auspices of the Aboriginal Arts Board. The comments are offered for whatever good they can do in unravelling the mystery of the past: 1. "Jupiter was once ... man who had a head and no body." 2. "Near or far apart though the planets [Venus and Jupiter may be... they are Katta-ku-diarra [trans.- heads two having no bodies." 3. "And they [the Aborigines can look at him [Jupiter in the cold times and not be anymore afraid of him." 4. "To the natives of Australia, the brilliant Jupiter is a chief among the others."- J. E. Aitchison, North Lambton, ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 270  -  05 Mar 2003  -  10k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/workshop/vol0501/38letts.htm
14. Pot Pourri [SIS C&C Review $]
... [5 suggests that the Australians had any genetic influence on the Americas. Furthermore, Sykes states that all four mcDNA clans in the Americas have close genetic links to those in N.E. Asia and Oppenheimer shows [6 that, of all the Pacific clusters, the Aboriginal Australians are the furthest removed (genetically) from these Asians. In the transcript, Richard Neave (University of Manchester) says the skull of Luzia shows 'a Negroid face'; Walter Neves, Prof. of Biological Anthropology at the Univ. of Sao Paulo ... this pattern reached the Americas and Sykes (see above) would seem to suggest not; the Polynesians visited but left no genetic imprint on that continent. The transcript of the programme proposes not just trans-Pacific links but, specifically, contact and occupation by ancestors of Australian Aborigines [4. However, neither Sykes nor Oppenheimer [5 suggests that the Australians had any genetic influence on the Americas. Furthermore, Sykes states that all four mcDNA clans in the Americas have close genetic links to those in N.E. Asia and Oppenheimer shows [ ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 253  -  05 Mar 2003  -  33k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/review/v2001n2/49pot.htm
... itself since these meteorites don't have enough uranium in the first instance to create the measured anomaly. Unless the Wolfe Creek Crater meteorite was a rare one, which did have elevated levels of uranium, but there is little data to form this interpretation, if any. Aboriginal myths about Wolfe Creek Crater are unusual and the one published by the West Australian Museum mentions the local story of two rainbow snakes, whose sinuous paths across the desert formed the nearby Sturt and Wolfe Creeks, and the crater marks the place where one of those ... ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** Wolfe Creek Crater By Louis A G Hissink MSc. Wolfe Creek Crater was first discovered in 1947 from an aerial survey, but was previously known to the local Aborigines as "Kandimalal". The crater is circular and has a diameter of 880 metres, with the floor of the crater some 60 meters below the rim. It lies 90 kilometres south of Halls Creek on the edge of the Great Sandy Desert in Western Australia ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 253  -  21 Mar 2007  -  37k  -  URL: http://www.kronia.com/thoth/thoVII03.txt
... spatial and temporal knowledge and skill was backed by astronomical lore. Various constellations were named and figured in myth, some (e.g. Castor and Pollux) throughout Australia and Tasmania, implying that the traditions originated in the Pleistocene before Tasmania was isolated. The Swan River aborigines distinguished and named at least eight phases in the waxing and waning of the moon....The moon... figured in widespread myths, waxing and waning, bringing death and regulating conception, the seasons of earth and of women.. .( 38 ... mastery of controlled agriculture and the rise of full civilisation. Tied to religion, ancient concerns with astronomy have remained an integral part of diverse human cultures to the present. North American lndians still preserve traditions believed to be remnants of the ancient Mesoamerican astronomical systems. Tasmanian aboriginals are said to exercise astronomic traditions possibly acquired in remote prehistory. Despite the various implications for prehistoric developments in astronomy, there has been little scientific interest in the question until recently. New discoveries in archeology have made it clear that prehistoric cultures were much more complex ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 249  -  05 Mar 2003  -  68k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/kronos/vol0204/029psych.htm
17. The Milky Way [Aeon Journal $]
... Milky Way as yaer dori, "the river of the sky." (7) The ancient Egyptians called it the "Winding Waterway." (8) To the Akkadians, apparently, it was Hid tsirra, "River-of-the-Snake." (9) The aboriginal peoples of Australia likewise knew the band of heaven as a great river, (10) as did the nomads of Siberia. (11) The very popularity of this theme of a heavenly river has led scholars to assume that it was only natural for primitive ... As we have just seen, the Akkadians called it Hid tsirra, "River-of-the-Snake." (14) This tradition finds a close parallel in ancient India, where the band was called Nagavithi, "the Path of the Snake." (15) The Australian aborigines likewise described the Milky Way as serpentine in nature. (16) In order to be similarly interpreted by peoples as disparate as the aboriginal peoples of Australia and Africa, the celestial serpent must needs be an obvious phenomenon. Yet who among us can point to ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 243  -  05 Mar 2003  -  99k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0404/039milky.htm
18. Day Star [Aeon Journal $]
... Venus was compared to an "eye" or a "flower" in the Old World as well as the New for the simple reason that it is exceedingly unlikely that the same metaphor would occur to different cultures were it not firmly rooted in natural experience. The Aboriginal tribes of Australia, like the Maya of Mesoamerica, compared Venus to a giant "eye" because that planet once presented the appearance of a Cyclopean eye in the center of the ancient sun-god (Saturn). Notes [1 P. Kirch, The Lapita ... example, Venus was known as Tamata-nui, "Great Eye." [5 The Polynesians, like the Maya, had a profound interest in the stars, which they employed as guides while navigating the South Seas and Pacific. Similar conceptions are apparent among the Australian Aborigines, the Ringa-Ringaroo denoting Venus as Mimungoona, "Big Eye." [6 If we are to rule out diffusion as an explanation for these particular epithets-- there being no evidence for a communication of astronomical traditions between these three cultures-- it stands ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 241  -  05 Mar 2003  -  29k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0506/021day.htm
19. Venus Before Exodus [SIS C&C Workshop $]
... rite." This would seem to indicate that, in Egypt, circumcision had a religious significance and never, seemingly, medical. 59. ANET, p.326 60. Jill Abery has indicated there is a parallel in Australian Aborigine practice to the Jewish circumcision. The Aborigines perform circumcision to appease "the great father snake"- and the snake or serpent is a Venus symbol. Jewish mythology has a story of like kind, about Moses being swallowed by a snake on account of his not being circumcised (Exodus 4:24-26 ... inscriptions never make mention of doctors performing the rite." This would seem to indicate that, in Egypt, circumcision had a religious significance and never, seemingly, medical. 59. ANET, p.326 60. Jill Abery has indicated there is a parallel in Australian Aborigine practice to the Jewish circumcision. The Aborigines perform circumcision to appease "the great father snake"- and the snake or serpent is a Venus symbol. Jewish mythology has a story of like kind, about Moses being swallowed by a snake on account of his ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 237  -  05 Mar 2003  -  49k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/workshop/w1987no2/36extra.htm
20. Thundergods and Thunderbolts [Aeon Journal $]
... this motif, Frazer remarks that "it is a common notion with the American Indians that thunder and lightning are caused by the flapping of the wings and the flashing of the eyes of a gigantic bird." [47 Similar beliefs are also to be found among aboriginal peoples of South America. Thus, the Desana of the Colombian rain forest hold that lightning is "a glance the Sun casts upon the earth." [48 How are we to understand this widespread belief whereby lighting is thought to emanate from a celestial eye ... Numerous cultures compared the Milky Way to a giant serpent winding across the sky. The natives of the Nyassaland in Africa hold that the celestial band of stars is a great python. [150 The Maya compared the Milky Way to a Fer-de-lance. [151 The Australian aborigines likewise described the Milky Way as serpentine in nature. [152 Other cultures compared the Milky Way to a ladder spanning heaven. Such ideas are attested in the New World among the Navaho: "In Acoma sandpaintings the Milky Way appears as a ladder, for ...
Terms matched: 2  -  Score: 237  -  04 Jan 2005  -  116k  -  URL: http://www.catastrophism.com/online/pubs/journals/aeon/vol0601/095thund.htm
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